Monthly Archives June 2017

REVIEW: IT COMES AT NIGHT

Here in the South, we have a saying – “Bless her heart” or “Bless his heart.” We use this as a precursor to saying something negative about someone. Example: “Gladys, bless her heart, has just never had the best taste in paisley linens.” By the Rules of Southern Etiquette, using this phrase cancels out anything negative we might say afterward. It’s a “Get Out of Jail Free” card, if you will, and universally recognized if your entire universe is The South. So, with that explanation out of the way, I offer these three words to It Comes at Night: Bless
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Mining THE ARCHIVE: Exploring Vinegar Syndrome’s New Brick and Mortar Store [+ Interview With Brandon Upson and James Neurath of Vinegar Syndrome]

  In the seaport city of Bridgeport, Connecticut, nestled unassumingly in a strip of buildings on an ordinary stretch of road, you’ll find The Archive. It’s a nondescript storefront in an ordinary location, unremarkable from the outside. Open the door, however, and you’ll enter a genre film wonderland. The Archive is a brand-new movie, music and culture shop from the team behind Vinegar Syndrome, film restoration and distribution company and stalwart champions of cult and exploitation home video. This past weekend, they celebrated the store’s soft opening, and I was on-hand to check it out. Photo courtesy of The Archive
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HOME VIDEO: A CURE FOR WELLNESS

Caution: this essay contains spoilers! Anti-hero Lockhart (Dane DeHaan) is on a fast track to the Executive Floor. When his firm undergoes some financial – as well as legal – troubles, Lockhart is chosen to retrieve the vacationing board member Pembroke (Harry Groener) so he may assist in keeping the scandal under wraps. Lockhart travels to a luxury spa resort located in the Swiss Alps, but when he arrives, he soon learns there’s something a bit more sinister going on than just steam baths. Every leeway he makes in his investigation is marred by the devious Dr. Volmer (Jason Isaacs),
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Netflix Weekly: BLAME!

I was very excited to watch Blame! without knowing very much about it, and for a big reason: I’m currently on an anime kick, and in my opinion I haven’t watched a lot of anime films. Sure, I’ve watched the essentials like Akira and Perfect Blue and Spirited Away and Ghost in the Shell and…I’ll stop there because it seems like a lot (but I suspect a real anime fan knows that’s nowhere even close). The aforementioned kick I’ve been on comes in the form of some anime TV series such as Re:Zero, Hunter x Hunter and currently Toriko, and
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REVIEW: THE COMMUNE

Thomas Vinterberg is the master of shocking revelation and painful discomfort. In his 1998 masterpiece, The Celebration, a birthday gathering to honor a beloved patriarch is rocked to its core when his son announces that he and his sister were sexually abused by the man as children. His 2012 film, The Hunt, dealt with similarly controversial subject matter, with Mads Mikkelsen as a beloved teacher accused of a terrible crime against children. In his latest picture, The Commune, Vinterberg has mellowed out a bit – not a long, but a bit. In fact, one could call his latest film “hopeful”
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From the Stereo to Your Screen: Goo Goo Dolls & Freddy’s Dead: The Final Nightmare

“I’m Awake Now,” by Goo Goo Dolls, from Freddy’s Dead: The Final Nightmare Back when I discussed Phunk Junkeez and their contribution to the Tommy Boy soundtrack, I mentioned offhand that Goo Goo Dolls’ cover of The Damned’s “Wait for the Blackout” wasn’t bad. Being as how I’m always trying to track down weird-ass music videos for this column as well as look for bands to come on my soundtrack podcast and talk about how weird it was to have their song in a movie, I come across quite a few surprises. Thus, we come to the fact that Goo
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REVIEW: Wonder Woman Lassos Up a Win

This review contains some spoilers. “Be careful of mankind, Diana, they do not deserve you.” These are some of the last words spoken by Hippolyta, Queen of the Amazons, before watching her daughter sail away from her forever, and into the uncertain future of Man’s World. Mankind, and whether it deserves saving, is a question central to the heart of Patty Jenkins’ Wonder Woman and cuts to the very core of what the character represents. When psychologist and women’s rights advocate William Moulton Marston created Wonder Woman in 1941, he did so with a specific aim in mind. Literature, he thought,
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