Monthly Archives September 2017

Are You Afraid of the Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark Twilight Zone? Cemetery Gates Media’s new Kickstarter for ‘Corpse Cold’

Cemetery Gates Media is launching a Kickstarter campaign on September 30th to fund a fully-illustrated book of spooky stories inspired by ’80s and ’90s horror books like Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark. The book, Corpse Cold: New American Folklore, features 17 stories, written by John Brhel and Joe Sullivan and illustrated by artist Chad Wehrle. We found out about the upcoming release via the Cemetery Gates Instagram — which is excellent — so we reached out, and spoke via email with the company’s John Brhel. What brought you to the publishing business? When we were finished writing our
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Exploitation.TV Party: SEXTOONS

Launching in 2013 with the release of the Lost Films of Herschell Gordon Lewis, Vinegar Syndrome quickly cemented themselves as one of the most important and exciting companies in the recent boutique home video boom. Presenting high quality transfers — of which they create in-house — of rare and overlooked works, VinSyn put a loving touch into their work that sets them a step above many of their competitors. In 2015, the company made a significant evolution and birthed Exploitation.tv. Exploitation.tv — “a subscription based streaming service focused exclusively on offering fans of exploitation cinema the largest online library of feature films,
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CINEPUNX Episode 70: Rob Skvarla Talks Psuedo-Documentaries (MONDO CANE, THE CHARIOTS OF THE GODS, THE LATE GREAT PLANET EARTH)

http://media.blubrry.com/cinepunx/p/www.cinepunx.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Cinepunx_Episode_70.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSSHELLO THERE CITIZENS, ARE YOU READY FOR ANOTHER DIRE YET ENTERTAINING TRANSMISSION FROM PLANET CINEPUNX? That works, right? Hey friends, we return to you with another dynamic episode, filled with thrills and chills and…spills? This time for episode 70 we welcomed Rob Skvarla, writer/programmer/cineaste/unrepentant Goth Sad BOY! I am so fat in that last picture, holy shit. Rob brought a topic to us which we would NEVER have chosen on our own but relates to his own research in gradschool, that is Psuedo-Documentaries. The three Rob chose for
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Hail mother!, Full of Grace

  “Blessed art thou among women/ And blessed is the fruit of thy womb,/ Jesus.” -Hail Mary “The whole book’s gender biased…Read that book again sometime. Women are painted as bigger antagonists than the Egyptians and Romans combined. It stinks.” -Salma Hayek, Dogma Spoilers to follow As of this writing, there are as many theories as to what mother! is about as there are viewers of Darren Aronofsky’s mother!. Everyone seems to agree that the film is a naked and heavy-handed allegory, but no one can seem to agree on what exactly the movie is saying with such a heavy-hand. Depending
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Review: SLIMED

Slimed, an independent blast of schlock wonder was finished nearly ten years ago, and it’s packed with everything writer/directors Eric Manche and Jeff Nitzberg wanted in a movie: “absurdity, action, comedy, apocalyptic stakes and evil hand puppets.” Yep. Hand puppets. This movie has everything you could possibly want from a trashy flick. And a mystical cat. And green screen running scenes. So, yeah: like, everything. It’s a crazypants bag of tricks which manages to subvert expectations at every turn, both from a Troma movie and a film which openly advertises the fact it has exploding children in its tag line.
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In Theaters: mother!

My original plan for this review, since I was hoping to Mandate it, was to get the best of both worlds by recording my own immediate thoughts on the film and then transcribing them into a review. It would have been easier and a different take on your standard babble trying to describe what you just saw and how you felt or connected with it. Unfortunately (or maybe for the better) Darren Aronofsky put together a film challenging enough that I was left in full ramble mode, and found myself recording something that bounced too far all over the place to
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Netflix Weekly: LITTLE EVIL

Is there such a thing as the “feel good” horror sub-genre? I think there is. You know what I mean, right? You put on a horror movie sometimes, not to be scared, but to chill and get lost for a couple of hours. Take Little Evil as a recent example. Little Evil tells the story of Gary (Adam Scott) and how he’s adjusting to the two biggest changes of his life: getting married to the woman of his dreams, Samantha (Evangeline Lilly), and becoming a stepdad to her son, Lucas (Owen Atlas). Everything’s moving so fast for him, but he can’t
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Review: IT (2017)

I’ve often spoken of how nostalgia is a very powerful factor in how we view art. It is a lens that is both effective and unreliable when consuming art; if we develop an attachment to something at an age that we might not be too discerning between good art and bad art, that attachment lingers. I mean, just look at me: I’m 34 years old and I’m still terrified of a book I read when I was a kid. I’ve grown older, and I’m no longer afraid (that much) of aliens and the ’88 version of The Blob. The goopy
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INTERVIEW: Spectacular Optical’s Kier-La Janisse on their upcoming YULETIDE TERROR

Canadian small-press publisher Spectacular Optical has started to become the go-to place for intriguing books on genre topics. Be it their look at ’80s hysteria in Satanic Panic: Pop Cultural Paranoia in the 1980s, the first comprehensive analysis of director Jean Rollin in Lost Girls, or “the cool and inspiring kids of cult film and television” in Kid Power, Spectacular Optical is killing it. The same can be said for their upcoming Yuletide Terror: Christmas Horror On Film And Television, due out just in time for the holiday season. A brief run-through of the essays included reads like a who’s
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CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF THE THIRD KIND at 40: We’re Still Not Alone

As you may have heard, this year is the 40th anniversary of Steven Spielberg’s Close Encounters of the Third Kind. For years I’ve said without hesitation that it’s my favorite Spielberg film, but without putting much thought into why. On the occasion of its theatrical re-re-re-release, I think it’s time to look back at just what makes this film so powerful. Close Encounters of the Third Kind straddles the line between 1970s New Hollywood and the explosion of the blockbuster in the 1980s — more than perhaps any other film considering its complex release history. The theatrical cut was released
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