Monthly Archives October 2017

CINEPUNX Episode 71: Grady Hendrix talks PAPERBACKS FROM HELL

http://media.blubrry.com/cinepunx/p/www.cinepunx.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Cinepunx_Episode_71.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSSAHOY THERE PUNX OF YON CINEMA! Hey friends, and welcome to a brand spanking new Cinepunx episode. On this unique episode we sat down with Grady Hendrix!   We spent most of the episode discussing his new book PAPERBACKS FROM HELL! Of course, by “we” I don’t mean Josh and I because, unfortunately, Josh could not join us! No worries, CINEPUNX veterans Evan Vellela and Joseph Gervasi were able to sit in and make the episode awesome. Not much to talk about here, not only is the episode self
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HAPPY DEATH DAY: A Refreshingly Honest Slasher With a Killer Twist

In a world where we have Mean Girls, Scream, and Groundhog Day, a movie that combines all three films may seem a bit unnecessary. But whether we like that idea or not, here comes Happy Death Day anyway, creeping into theaters just in time for Halloween. Teresa “Tree” Gelbman (Jessica Rothe) inexplicably begins to relive the day of her murder, which also happens to be her birthday. She continually wakes up in the dorm room of a boy she barely knows, Carter (Israel Broussard), who eventually assists in her discovery of the identity of her murderer. Along the way we meet Tree’s callous sorority sisters
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Friday Double Feature: Past & Present Tense

In his review for David Robert Mitchell’s 2014 film It Follows, The Wall Street Journal’s Joe Morgenstern referred to the film as “a vivid example of musically transmitted anxiety.” Thanks to the score by composer and musician Disasterpeace, the film is a ridiculously tense piece of horror. Watching It Follows feels like you’re making clenched fist with your entire body, never quite certain as to what’s next. Vulture’s David Edelstein described it as “the so-upset-I-feel-sick kind of amorphous dread,” and a more perfect summation, I can’t think of to describe what Wikipedia calls the tale of “a teenage girl, Jay,
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Filmiversary: 1408, Stephen King’s Oft-Overlooked Haunted Hotel Story

(CAUTION: This essay is spoiler-heavy. Also, please note the film version discussed in this essay is the Theatrical Cut.)   In spite of The Dark Tower’s cold reception, it’s no secret that It and Gerald’s Game have solidified 2017 as the year of “good” Stephen King adaptations. Those two films are great and resonate because they’re made by people who want to do right by the stories they come from; both adaptations were handled with such care, given a loving touch by filmmakers who owe a great creative debt to King. These guys grew up on King; his stories ingrained
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BAT PUSSY Bounces Onto Blu-Ray, Tramples Our Libidos

For certain cinephiles, there’s a sacred joy in wading deep into the muck and mire of trash cinema to emerge — triumphant — with a story to tell. Chalk it up to the deeply satisfying thrill of stumbling upon something wild and weird, exchanging notes with fellow travelers, and basking in the validation of the experience. The primo fodder for these bonding rituals are the kinds of movies so unusual, astoundingly inept or bugfuck absurd they must be seen to be believed. Bat Pussy hits all the marks. The history of Bat Pussy is fittingly strange and obscure, though not
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“Cells Interlinked Within Cells Interlinked”: The Subversive Metanarrative of BLADE RUNNER 2049

WARNING: This article contains spoilers, including discussion of the final scenes of the film. If you haven’t seen Blade Runner 2049, then hurry up and see it on the biggest screen with the best sound system you can find. Then come back and read this.     “You’ve never seen a miracle.” The line, spoken by Dave Bautista’s Sapper Morton early in Blade Runner 2049 (Denis Villeneuve, 2017), is apt not only in setting up the film’s narrative & thematic progression, but also in describing the film itself. That a sequel made thirty years after the original, peppered with occasional cameos from original
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THE DREAM CHILD: The Unsung Nightmare on Elm Street

It has long since been stated that The Dream Child, the fifth installment in the long-running Nightmare on Elm Street franchise, is the worst amongst the bunch. I’ve always found this claim to be asinine, as the film exists in a universe that includes Freddy’s Dead. Even without the existence of the purported ‘final Nightmare,’ I’d still scoff at the disdain heaped upon the fourth sequel. Sure, there’d be more weight behind the argument, but the film being the worst in the franchise doesn’t automatically make it bad. On the contrary, I find it to be quite good. A misunderstood
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WE GOT ISSUES: SLAYER: REPENTLESS

What follows, dear reader, is one random miscreant’s thoughts regarding the new comic book based on the music and the members of the massively popular thrash metal band SLAYER. Since this unique work of fiction is dangerously straddling two worlds notorious for strong opinions, constant infighting, and misanthropic tendencies, I felt that I should start off with a sort of clarification/mission statement about what you’re about to read, for everyone’s benefit — but mostly for mine. The goal here is to inform and entertain, without getting swatted and then stabbed in the face. Wish me luck! What I’ve got to
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Friday Double Feature: The Art of Murder in A BUCKET OF BLOOD & COLOR ME BLOOD RED

As noted by Clive Davies in his book Spinegrinder: The Movies Most Critics Won’t Write About, Herschell Gordon Lewis’ 1965 film, Color Me Blood Red, “is kind of an extension of A Bucket of Blood,” directed by Roger Corman in 1959. While the former is a brightly-colored, slightly serious picture, and the latter a black-and-white laugh riot, the films do share quite a few details. They’re both about frustrated artists who turn to murder in order to find greater success. Both find their inspiration via accident, and are eventually discovered due to sloppy corpse disposal. A Bucket of Blood is,
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Bookshelf: WHAT THE HELL DID I JUST READ

At their heart, David Wong’s books set in the town of Undisclosed are about perception. His first novel, John Dies at the End, its sequel, This Book Is Full of Spiders, and the latest, What the Hell Did I Just Read, all deal with the fact that what we’re seeing with our eyes might not actually be what’s going on. The first two novels address it somewhat circuitously, but What the Hell Did I Just Read explicitly tackles the subject, wondering if our protagonist (also named David Wong) and his buddy John are actually supernatural investigators and problem-solvers, or just,
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