Monthly Archives March 2018

CINEPUNX Episode 78: HOWARD THE DUCK and TEMPLE OF DOOM Discussion with Director Liam O’Donnell (BEYOND SKYLINE)

http://media.blubrry.com/cinepunx/p/www.cinepunx.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Cinepunx_Episode_78.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSSHERE WE GO HERE WE GO HERE WE GO It finally HAPPENED! Yes, I partly mean we finally have TWO EPISODES OF CINEPUNX OUT IN ONE MONTH!! However, what I really mean is that we finally have director LIAM O’DONNELL, my dopple ganger and director of Beyond Skyline on the show! On this episode Liam joins us to talk a little bit about the maing of Beyond Skyline, and then to discuss two films that shaped our childhoods: Howard the Duck and Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom.
Read More

7 Faces of Dr. Lao

  This is REKT, the column where each month one Cinepunx staffer recommends films to the rest of the fam. We may be stoked, or we may be wrecked. This month, it’s Elbee’s turn to do the damage. Here are Trey Lawson‘s thoughts on 1964’s 7 Faces of Dr. Lao.   I love old genre movies. They take me back to childhood, when my dad would rent old movies from when he was younger for me to watch. It was kind of a bonding thing, I suppose. Given its 1964 release date and subject matter, 7 Faces of Dr. Lao is exactly the
Read More

Cinematic Synths: Metavari’s Nate Utesch

A great number of micro labels have popped up parallel to the soundtrack resurgence. While Death Waltz, One Way Static, and Giallo Disco do a lot of soundtrack reissues and releases, they’ve also been at work to present new artists working in the the ‘genre.’ Acts – like Videogram, Antoni Maiovvi, Metavari, and Espectrostatic – all inspired, in one way or another, by synth-laden horror and thriller scores. These labels and artists are the next step for those who’ve gotten into soundtracks, but want something that works more as a musical experience, rather than one tied directly to a film.
Read More

The Pawnbroker

This is REKT, the column where each month one Cinepunx staffer recommends films to the rest of the fam. We may be stoked, or we may be wrecked. This month, it’s Elbee’s turn to do the damage. Here are Nick Spacek’s thoughts on 1964’s The Pawnbroker.   When I was in college, I took a class called Literature of the Holocaust. Taught by a woman named MJ McLendon, it was held in a basement classroom of the most depressing building on the University of Kansas campus. It was also during a particularly bleak spring, with quite a bit of gray-skied weather
Read More

Cinematic Synths: Espectrostatic’s Alex Cuervo

A great number of micro labels have popped up parallel to the soundtrack resurgence. While Death Waltz, One Way Static, and Giallo Disco do a lot of soundtrack reissues and releases, they’ve also been at work to present new artists working in the the ‘genre.’ Acts – like Videogram, Antoni Maiovvi, Metavari, and Espectrostatic – all inspired, in one way or another, by synth-laden horror and thriller scores. These labels and artists are the next step for those who’ve gotten into soundtracks, but want something that works more as a musical experience, rather than one tied directly to a film.
Read More

Netflix Weekly: SPECTRAL

You know what’s incredible? When you can watch a movie that rocks your foundation, when a film provides you an experience that you’ll never forget and it inspires you along your quest of life. Or how about the flip side: those days where you watch a film so terrible it shakes your core? When we watch a movie, we’re spending time with an art form and it’s time we won’t get back, and let’s be honest: they won’t all be huge winners or gigantic flops. The glorious cinematic middle ground is where a ton of films find their home. If
Read More

Cinematic Synths: Videogram’s Magnus Sellergren

A great number of micro labels have popped up parallel to the soundtrack resurgence. While Death Waltz, One Way Static, and Giallo Disco do a lot of soundtrack reissues and releases, they’ve also been at work to present new artists working in the the ‘genre.’ Acts – like Videogram, Antoni Maiovvi, Metavari, and Espectrostatic – all inspired, in one way or another, by synth-laden horror and thriller scores. These labels and artists are the next step for those who’ve gotten into soundtracks, but want something that works more as a musical experience, rather than one tied directly to a film.
Read More

JUST ANNOUNCED – CINEDELPHIA 666 HIGHLIGHTS AND SCHEDULE

Hear ye witches, goblins, and film lovers, things are getting diabolic at this year’s Cinedelphia Film Festival! Presented by PhilaMOCA, 2018 is the 6th year running for CFF – and they’ve affectionately titled this incarnation of the fest “Cinedelphia 666.” This year’s festival theme is centered around “spirituality, the occult, and outsider thought,” with the infernal events kicking off April 12. Opening night of the fest will feature TST founder Lucien Grieves performing a live ritual followed by a screening of the Mexican cult film Alucarda. Other highlights of CFF this year include actress Jessica Harper in attendance for a
Read More

CINEPUNX Episode 77: DARK CITY at 20 or LIAM TRIES TO ALIENATE OUR ENTIRE AUDIENCE

http://media.blubrry.com/cinepunx/p/www.cinepunx.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Cinepunx_Episode_77.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSSGREETINGS CINEMA-PUNKERS AND WELCOME TO ANOTHER DARK AND IMPOSING EPISODE!!! On this, our triumphant return to the realm of podcasting we tackle Dark City,  a film from the director of  The Crow! YEAH! OK LOOK, I need to immediately apologize to all of your. The first reason is that this episode is a bit low energy because I have been sick and exhausted lately, and so this was my general demeanor during the recording   Not exactly the dynamic presence you have come to love and expect! Second, we
Read More

Bookshelf: Screening Stephen King Has Bad Timing, But Solid Premises

Simon Brown’s new book from University of Texas Press, Screening Stephen King: Adaptation and the Horror Genre in Film and Television couldn’t have come out at a worse time. This isn’t to say that it’s not a well-written analysis of the literature and screen adaptations from one of the best-selling authors of all time; that aspect of Screening Stephen King is inherent in Brown’s book, and the author is well-acquainted with every iteration of King’s work, no matter how tangential. No, what makes the book’s timing unfortunate is that it was obviously written and planned just a little too early.
Read More