Monthly Archives May 2018

The Pasolini Project: A Journey Into Pasolini – PART 3: THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO ST. MATTHEW

  This is The Pasolini Project, a monthly discussion series from Adrianna Gober and Doug Tilley, delving into a vast body of work that, until relatively recently, had not been widely available on home video: the films of director, poet, journalist, and philosopher, Pier Paolo Pasolini. We’ll be exploring Pasolini’s filmography in chronological order, taking occasional detours through his staggeringly extensive artistic efforts outside of film, as well as the work of his collaborators and other related media. For Part Three of our deep dive into all things Pasolini, we’re cracking open The Gospel According to St. Matthew. For the
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REKT: The Duke of Burgundy

This is REKT, the column where each month one Cinepunx staffer recommends films to the rest of the fam. We may be stoked, or we may be wrecked. This month, it’s Adrianna Gober’s turn to do the damage. Here are Elbee‘s thoughts on The Duke of Burgundy.   Adrianna has been trying to get me to watch The Duke of Burgundy for what seems like decades; this is an absolute fact. When we first discussed the film all those years ago, I told her I had started watching it once and was intrigued, however (as I often do) I fell asleep
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REKT: My Own Private Idaho

This is REKT, the column where each month one Cinepunx staffer recommends films to the rest of the fam. We may be stoked, or we may be wrecked. This month, it’s Adrianna Gober’s turn to do the damage. Here are Trey Lawson’s thoughts on My Own Private Idaho.   My Own Private Idaho is one of my big blindspots of ’90s cinema, and it is especially egregious considering that when I’m not writing about film, I write about English Renaissance history plays. This film is, of course, partly a loose adaptation of Shakespeare’s Henry IV plays transposed into early ’90s Portland, among
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REKT: David France’s HOW TO SURVIVE A PLAGUE

This is REKT, the column where each month one Cinepunx staffer recommends films to the rest of the fam. We may be stoked, or we may be wrecked. This month, it’s Adrianna Gober’s turn to do the damage. Here are Nick Spacek’s thoughts on How to Survive a Plague. I considered starting this with “I don’t want to get all political, but …”, but figured that no, I do, in fact want to get political when discussing David France’s 2012 documentary, How to Survive a Plague. Starting in 1987, France’s film documents the creation and rise of ACT UP (AIDS
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Graham Skipper’s Directorial Debut, SEQUENCE BREAK, is a Gooey Mess of Weird

I have no idea what the hell is going on in Sequence Break, Graham Skipper’s directorial debut. It’s spinning, nightmarish bit of psychedelic craziness that circles back onto itself multiple times, and the plot leaves so much to the viewer’s imagination that even the plot summary offers up little to clarify matters: A reclusive video arcade repairman (Chase Williamson) experiences bizarre biomechanical mutations and Cronenbergian hallucinations when a mysterious new arcade machine appears in his shop. Reality itself threatens to fracture as the young man works to solve its mystery – and overcome the new chaos that has entered his
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REKT: Gregg Araki’s THE LIVING END

This is REKT, the column where each month one Cinepunx staffer recommends films to the rest of the fam. We may be stoked, or we may be wrecked. This month, it’s Adrianna Gober’s turn to do the damage. Here are Justin Harlan’s thoughts on The Living End.   Last month, I had the pleasure of choosing some films for other folks here on Cinepunx to watch. Several were chosen and consumed, and three made it up as part of our monthly REKT series. My selections were all films featuring one of my favorite actors of all time, the neurotic John Cusack.
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CINEPUNX Episode 81: 30 Years of Living Next to TOTORO: Reflections on Hayao Miyazaki

http://media.blubrry.com/cinepunx/p/www.cinepunx.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Cinepunx_Episode_81.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSSLIKE A GIANT SLAPSHOD HOUSE POWERED BY AN ANGRY FIRE DEMON, THE LATEST EPISODE OF CINEPUNX HAS COME CLAMORING INTO YOUR LIVE, AND IS ALSO VOICED BY BILLY CRYSTAL! OK, that was a random pull. Hey friends, and welcome to a steaming hot take filled episode of CINEPUNX! On this illustrious return we dive in with one of animations greatest story tellers, Hayao Miyazaki. It is the 30th anniversary of the release of My Neighbor Totoro, one of Miyazaki’s most beloved films, and one Josh had not had
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Bookshelf: BIOLOGY RUN AMOK! Teaches Science Facts With Schlock Films

In the introduction to his new book, Biology Run Amok!: The Life Science Lessons of Science Fiction Cinema, Mark C. Glassy makes the point that it’s “very important to realize that the art of storytelling may be at odds with scientific accuracy.” As he goes on to point out, “plot often trumps science, but science can also improve the storyline.” The 22 essays within the pages of Biology Run Amok! were originally published in Scary Monsters magazine between 2010-16, and four of them were nominated for “Best Article” in the Rondo Awards. Glassy, a cancer immunologist at the University of
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Films From the Void: THE BLOODTHIRSTY TRILOGY & Japanese Vampires

There aren’t a lot of extras on the new release of Toho Studios’ trio of vampire movies, collectively known as The Bloodthirsty Trilogy, but given Arrow Video’s excellent high-definition presentation, there doesn’t really need to be; especially with three films to work one’s way through: The Vampire Doll, Lake of Dracula, and Evil of Dracula. However, the one extra aside from stills and trailers is “Kim Newman on The Bloodthirsty Trilogy,” a video appraisal by the critic and writer. It’s essentially just Newman talking about vampire pictures and how Japanese producers adapted them for their audience, but it’s really a
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Cinematic Synths: One Way Static’s Sebastiaan Putseys

A great number of micro labels have popped up parallel to the soundtrack resurgence. While Death Waltz, One Way Static, and Giallo Disco do a lot of soundtrack reissues and releases, they’ve also been at work to present new artists working in the the ‘genre.’ Acts like  Videogram, Antoni Maiovvi, Metavari, and Espectrostatic — all inspired, in one way or another, by synthy horror and thriller scores. These labels and artists are the next step for those who’ve gotten into soundtracks, but want something that works more as a musical experience, rather than one tied directly to a film. In
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