Monthly Archives July 2018

ZOMBI TIME EATERS: An Entire Day On the Couch With an Italian Franchise

On a Monday in early July, I took advantage of my day off to watch all five installments in the Italian Zombi pentalogy. Starting by watching Dario Argento’s cut of Dawn of the Dead, titled Zombi for its Italian release, all the way through 1988’s Zombi 5: Killing Birds, it was all gut-munching, all day. Inspired by Severin’s recent Blu-ray releases of Zombi 3 and Zombie 4: After Death, I figured I might as well see what all the fuss was about. It was an odd experience, since I was experiencing some of the films for the umpteenth time, while
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CINEPUNX Episode 83: THE SEVENTH SEAL, PERSONA

http://media.blubrry.com/cinepunx/p/www.cinepunx.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Cinepunx_Episode_83.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSSCINEPUNX IS HERE! Hey friends, thanks for joining us for a new episode of Cinepunx! On this episode we begin what will hopefully be a returning journey into the films of Ingmar Bergman, with The Seventh Seal and Persona.  We are no Bergman scholars but we do our best to dive into these films. As always, we would love your input as to how we did, what could be better, and what resources we should check out for further conversations. As always thanks to our Patreon supporters and to our
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WHO CAN KILL A CHILD? Only One Person, Evidently

If you’ve never seen Narciso Ibáñez Serrador’s 1976 killer kid movie, Who Can Kill A Child? (aka Island of the Damned, aka Who Could Kill a Child?, aka Death is Child’s Play, aka The Hex Massacre, aka Trapped), be prepared to be slightly bored for about 80 minutes of its nearly two-hour runtime. It’s not due to the usual slower pace of ‘70s European horror films, but rather due to some legitimate issues with the flow of the film. Who Can Kill A Child? falls in the category of films which pad their running time with what feels like ages
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GODMONSTER OF INDIAN FLATS provides social commentary & a mutated sheep

Oh, my flipping lord. The American Genre Film Archive has once again dove into the Something Weird vault to clean up and release another stylistic mashup to turn your mind inside out. In this case, it’s 1973’s Godmonster of Indian Flats, whose plot summary barely does it justice: “Just when you thought it was safe to go back to the petting zoo! From the singular mind of infamous artist Fredric C. Hobbs (ALABAMA’S GHOST, ROSELAND), this is the story of an eight-foot-tall toxic sheep monster that blows up gas stations, smashes crooked politicians, and terrorizes stoners. In the words of
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Purgin’ It, or How THE FIRST PURGE Gives Us What We Need

There’s an old talking point that says when Republicans are in office, we get better horror films. It’s not entirely inaccurate, either; a quick look at the horror boom in the early 1980s probably provides the easiest and best evidence of this idea, considering what was happening not only stateside but in the world. Some of you may be too young to remember the Cold War (I’m old, and I barely do), but with Ronald Reagan’s masterful “Bear in the Woods” tactics tricking America into thinking doom and demise were around the corner, the social climate was set up perfectly
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SWEET SWEETBACK’S BADASSSSS SONG Has Never Been Sung So Sweetly

If you go into Melvin Van Peebles’ 1971 film, Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song, expecting “blaxploitation” as we’ve come to know it, you’re going to be sorely disappointed. You’d think, given the film’s elevated status, more folks would understand the fact that this is a supremely political polemic against the system. But no, first time viewers expect something like Shaft or Superfly, and get all weirded out by the fact that this is 50% French New Wave and the rest is unapologetically pro-black and anti-establishment. “Director/writer/producer/editor/composer Melvin Van Peebles stars as a black orphan raised in a brothel and groomed to
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XTRO: Not All Aliens Are Friendly, or Cute, or Particularly Lucid

Second Sight’s Blu-ray restoration of the 1980 alien possession film, Xtro, is the best the British director Harry Bromley-Davenport’s movie has ever looked. Well, kind of. There are multiple versions of the film on the disc that’s out now, including a re-colored version by the director himself.Stick with the Second Sight restoration. Bromley-Davenport’s version looks pretty nice during daylit scenes, but if there’s any darkness, the contrast gets blown out so bad the white positively glares. It’s a visual nightmare that does more harm than good. Anyhow, the film, should you not be familiar with it from the Horror Business
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