Monthly Archives September 2018

Free State Festival: A Week in Review

From Monday, September 17 through Sunday, September 23, the Lawrence Arts Center presented the 2018 Free State Festival. Over the years, the festival in Lawrence, Kansas, has gone from being a film fest to an all-around arts fest, to bringing acts like Public Enemy and George Clinton for huge street concerts, to what it is now: more of a balanced arts and culture festival, with an emphasis on film. Having attended several years of the festival, it seems like this year’s organizers made a distinct effort to have every event tie into one another and connect with the town as
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Festival Roundup: DEAD SOULS (2018, dir. Wang Bing)

This series will highlight films that have played and will be playing at various international film festivals, from Berlinale in Germany or Locarno in Switzerland to Toronto International Film Festival or New York Film Festival. The latest film under discussion premiered at Cannes and screened recently at TIFF. There are plans for release in US through Grasshopper Films. Chinese filmmaker Wang Bing is known primarily as a documentarian who operates frequently with a long form verité style. The most famous of his films is his 9-hour long debut, Tie Xi Qu: West of the Tracks (2002), a presentation of and immersion
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The Ten Most Underrated Emo Records of All Time

Ah, emo. The most fractious word in the history of the language of punk rock, a genre that has room for such delineations as “oogle,” “egg-punk,” “trash viper,” and “dumpster diver”; for such genre differentiation as “hardcore,” “slowcore,” “post-proto punk,” and “art punk” has often had a difficult time accepting what it considers its most derogatory nomenclature: emo. At this point, everyone knows that emo is short for emocore, which is short for emotional hardcore. It might have been slung as an insult towards hardcore punk bands of the mid-80s who chose to take an artier, dare I say it,
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Rekt: JOHNNY GUITAR

This is REKT, the column where each month one Cinepunx staffer recommends films to the rest of the fam. We may be stoked, or we may be wrecked. This month, it’s Trey Lawson’s turn to do the damage. Here are Elbee‘s thoughts on Johnny Guitar.   Admittedly, I may be cheating a little bit by picking this movie. We’re supposed to choose films from the recommendation list that we haven’t seen, or that we have seen and need to re-evaluate, and Johnny Guitar falls into neither for me. But I did watch it only recently, to widen my knowledge of westerns for an
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The Brooklyn Horror Film Festival is On the Way Next Month!

The Brooklyn Horror Film Festival hits New York October 11-18, and Cinepunx is covering it. Aren’t you excited? We are, obviously. Adrianna, Liam, and Nick are all going to see how many movies they can see before perishing of fright and/or sheer exhaustion, and given that the festival is so packed, we figured we’d share a few of the movies we’re most excited about. In addition to all of this, there are special screenings of The Burning, Sleepaway Camp, and My Bloody Valentine, a drinking game version of The Return of the Living Dead, as well as the launch of
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PUFF 3: THE WITCH IN THE WINDOW

Liam: The Philadelphia Unnamed Film Festival just finished its third year of presenting the latest in genre film to an eager audience in Center City Philly. Started in 2016 by Madeleine Koestner and Alex Gardner, PUFF seeks to fill the perceived void left by the end of the always amazing Danger After Dark series at Philadelphia Film Festival. Now, this is the first year Cinepunx, and by extension I, have made the effort to cover this fest, and I admit I went in skeptical. There have been many folks laboring away in Philly trying to represent genre film exhibition, as
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Festival Round-Up: TOO LATE TO DIE YOUNG (2018, dir. Dominga Sotomayor)

This series highlights films that have played and will be playing at film festivals around the world, from Berlinale in Germany or Venice International Film Festival in Italy to Toronto International Film Festival in Canada or New York Film Festival in the USA. The latest film I am turning my attention to saw its director win the Leopard for Best Direction at Locarno and debuts in Canada at TIFF on September 12 and the US at NYFF on September 29 and 30. Chile’s rising directorial talent Dominga Sotomayor Castillo is a filmmaker who, from the earliest days in her career, has
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Festival Round-up: SHOPLIFTERS (2018, dir. Hirokazu Kore-eda)

This series will highlight films that have played and will be playing at various international film festivals, from Berlinale in Germany or Locarno in Switzerland to Toronto International Film Festival or New York Film Festival. The second film I will be looking at won this year’s Palme d’Or at Cannes and debuts in Canada and the US on September 7th and October 6th respectively, followed by a broad theatrical release in the US on November 23rd. Since besting serious competition from the likes of Ash is Purest White (dir. Jia Zhangke), The Image Book (dir. Jean-Luc Godard), and Everybody Knows
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CINEPUNX Episode 85: DRUGSTORE COWBOY/ MY OWN PRIVATE IDAHO

http://media.blubrry.com/cinepunx/p/www.cinepunx.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Cinepunx_Episode_85.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSSHAIL AND WELL MET PUNKERS! We have returned for yet another uproarious episode of your favorite film and punk related podcast, CINEPUNX! On this magical episode, we begin a journey with a filmmaker who we are both largely unfamiliar with, Gus Van Sant! We spend some time discussing the films we know and the ones we don’t, but most of this episode we focus on two of his early films Drugstore Cowboy and My Own Private Idaho! Our opening song for this episode is the B-52s and our
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Bookshelf: Grady Hendrix’s WE SOLD OUR SOULS is a Love Letter to Heavy Metal and Friendship

“In the 1990s, heavy metal band Dürt Würk was poised for breakout success—but then lead singer Terry Hunt embarked on a solo career and rocketed to stardom as Koffin, leaving his fellow bandmates to rot in obscurity. Two decades later, former guitarist Kris Pulaski works as the night manager of a Best Western—she’s tired, broke, and unhappy. Everything changes when a shocking act of violence turns her life upside down, and she begins to suspect that Terry sabotaged more than just the band. Kris hits the road, hoping to reunite with the rest of her bandmates and confront the man
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