Monthly Archives October 2018

CINE-WEEN: Confessions of a Former Fraidy Cat

The house I lived in during senior year of college was a two-story joint, and one day my buddy Pete leaned over the balcony and said, his voice aghast, “What are you watching?” Actually, thinking back on it, it was more like, “What are you watching?” The answer was Peter Jackson’s seminal gore-tastic Dead Alive (aka Braindead), and the scene in particular was that film’s infamous climax which finds Lionel (Tim Balme) our schmucky protagonist strapping a lawnmower to his chest and wading into a cramped parlor filled with zombies. Limbs fly and blood pours by the gallons, at one
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CINE-WEEN: BLOODLUST; Or, How I Learned to Empathize with a Blood-Drinking Necrophiliac

“Haunted by a childhood trauma, a deaf mute accountant develops a fixation with blood spilling across his skin. Brief flirtations with ketchup and red ink seem to satisfy him at first but he soon develops a taste for the real thing. Though he nurses a weird fascination for a neighborhood girl who passes the time by dancing on the rooftop, he remains socially withdrawn with his co-workers and can’t even find comfort in the arms of a hooker. One night he breaks into the property of the local undertaker and ravages the prettiest female corpse. Now addicted, he habitually raids
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Brooklyn Horror Film Festival: STARFISH (2018)

It’s not often I consider myself “lucky” to have been able to consume a work of art, be it a song or a painting, a film or a TV show. After all, most of the art that has changed my life hasn’t exactly been some kind of secret gem; Dawn Of The Dead is hailed by many as the greatest zombie film of all time, and who among us wouldn’t consider Purple Rain a game changer? My point is, I don’t think I came close to missing the boat on a lot of the stuff that has had an impact on
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Brooklyn Horror Film Festival: WELCOME TO MERCY

“A young woman struggles against the unholy forces that possess her in this terrifying occult thriller. After being stricken with stigmata, single mother Madaline (Kristen Ruhlin) is sent to a remote convent where nothing is what it seems and her friend August (Lily Newmark) is seemingly the only person she can trust. Together, they must confront the demons inside Madaline before she becomes the Antichrist.” Fresh from its world premiere at the Brooklyn Horror Film Festival and directed by Tommy Bertelsen, from a screenplay by lead actress Kristen Ruhlin, IFC Midnight’s Welcome to Mercy is a film which is difficult
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Horror Fan Parenting 101: A Guide to One Dad’s Halloween Programming

Let me begin away from the parenting discussion with my own definitions of “horror.” I define horror very broadly. Is a film trying to scare you? It’s horror. Does it feature numerous horror tropes? It’s horror. Does it embody the spirit of horror or feature generally spooky things? It’s horror. I could do this for hours… For me, horror spans from extreme cinema like the American Guinea Pig series to the classic episodes of Scooby Doo. If it’s horror adjacent, if it’s a horror mashup, if it prominently features classic monsters, no matter the case — it’s horror to me.
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CINE-WEEN: Elbee Defends A Remake POLTERGEIST (2015)

Over the years, remakes — especially horror remakes — have gained such a sour reputation that even the mere mention of the word is immediately followed by groans, sighs, and rolled eyes. Of course, the main problem with remakes is that we can’t help but compare them to the original works. The other problem is that hardly anything is capable of conquering that beast called nostalgia. We have endless discussions of “what’s wrong with the original?” and “is this even necessary?” with points and counterpoints so meticulous that the whole argument has become exhausting. But what if we took that element
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CINE-WEEN: How I Finally Got Around to Watching the Original SUSPIRIA Just in Time For That New Shit

An American Tail is one of the most frightening movies I’ve ever seen. Just the thought of poor, wee, innocent mouse Fievel Mousekewitz, all alone in the world, separated from his family in a big city with no one to watch over him, gets the panicked heartbeats, accelerated breathing, and tears going. I remember the first time I watched it as a kid: all tortured soul and wounded puppy dog, curled up for days afterwards in anguish over Fievel’s initial abandonment, forgetting that yes, this movie has happy songs and an even happier ending. Once, I excitedly went to a
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CINE-WEEN: You’ll Never Escape From the DARK NIGHT OF THE SCARECROW

When you’re a horror fan, you have to approach the genre with a Ratatouille-like mindset: not every horror film is going to be great, but a great horror film could come from anywhere. Dark Night of the Scarecrow does not seem like it could be a good horror film. For God’s sake, this thing is a TV movie pumped out in 17 days for CBS. Sure, there’s a long history of high quality made-for-TV movies, but one look at the credits for Scarecrow reveals no luminaries behind the scenes, no name brands like Serling or Spielberg or Chayefsky that might
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CINE-WEEN: IT’S ALIVE! Celebrates 200 Years of Visual Artistry Around Frankenstein

Elizabeth Campbell Denlinger is the curator for the New York Public Library’s Carl H. Pforzheimer Collection of Shelley and His Circle. This means that Denlinger “builds the Library’s collections documenting British Romantic literature and promotes them through classes, publications, digital projects, and exhibitions.” One of those exhibitions is this year’s display at the Morgan Library & Museum, entitled “It’s Alive! Frankenstein at 200,” which will run from October 12, 2018 through January 27, 2019, and looks at the two century history of Mary Shelley’s seminal work. “It traces the origins and impact of her novel, which has been constantly reinterpreted
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REKT: CINE-WEEN EDITION-ALTERED (2006)

There’s a scene at the very end of 1993’s (I guess now) classic alien abduction thriller Fire In The Sky where Travis Walton (played by loveable everyman D.B. Sweeney) takes his former best friend Mike Rogers (played by unfortunately only a human and not liquid metal killer robot Robert Patrick) for a ride out to a field where Travis was abducted by aliens years ago. Rogers expresses nervousness at being there, to which Travis, giving his best aw shucks grin, reassures Mike that, “they won’t be comin’ back”. He then winks at him (I think) and quips, “I don’t think
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