Monthly Archives March 2019

Big Eyes’ Kait Eldridge On the Band’s Ever-Evolving Sound and Their New LP, STREETS OF THE LOST

When I first heard Big Eyes‘ debut single in early 2011, I wrote that the band “does the seemingly impossible task of reconciling arena rock with classic punk.” It’s still true, even as Big Eyes gets ready to release their fourth full-length, Streets of the Lost, via Greenway Records. Each album from the now-quartet has seen frontwoman Kaitlin Eldridge expand the band’s sonic palette, and their latest is no different. Streets of the Lost takes full advantage of Paul Ridenour on guitar, allowing Eldridge’s already robust riffs to double, and the rhythm section of Ridenour’s brother Jeff on bass and
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Blood, Sex and Falsies: Ed Wood’s Erotic Short Fiction Returns to Spread ANGORA FEVER

For many, the curious career of Edward D. Wood, Jr. begins and ends with the small selection of films that landed him the dubious title of Worst Director of All Time. Works like Glen or Glenda, Bride of the Monster and Plan 9 From Outer Space, all genre curiosities that made his name synonymous with noble failure and which eventually earned him a dedicated, if somewhat derisively ironic cult following. Public interest in Wood reached its peak with the acclaimed 1994 biopic starring Johnny Depp, before its subject and his work gradually faded back into the pop culture ether. For the adventurous few willing to dig
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Neon Indian’s Alan Palomo On His Score For the Hypnotically Repulsive RELAXER

Writer/director Joel Potrykus’ new film, Relaxer, is simultaneously hypnotic and repulsive. It all takes place in one room — on one couch, really — where Abbie (Joshua Burge) is attempting to beat 256 levels of Pac-Man, because he’s not allowed to get up until he does so. If this movie had a smell, it would be sweat on a vinyl couch, with a faint whiff of sour milk somewhere in the background. Y2K’s on the horizon, and a sense of mild panic is palpable. If The Greasy Strangler left you uncomfortable, Relaxer will have you cringing. And, yet, the film
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FROM THE STEREO TO YOUR SCREEN: Guns N’ Roses and TERMINATOR 2

Guns N’ Roses’ “You Could Be Mine” from Terminator 2: Judgment Day When Terminator 2: Judgment Day came out in the summer of 1991, I did not see it in the theater. My mom dropped my brother and I off at the theater some afternoon, and while my brother saw T2, I went to see The Naked Gun 2½: The Smell of Fear, and then killed time at the comic shop down the street during the remaining hour between when my movie let out and his did. This is really strange, because I’d buy the novelization and try to collect all
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BOOKSHELF: Qiana Whitted’s Brilliant Analysis of EC Comics “Preachies”

Qiana Whitted’s new book for Rutgers University Press, EC Comics: Race, Shock, and Social Protest, perfectly demonstrates why I love the ’50s publisher of titles like Tales from the Crypt, Shock SuspenStories, and Weird Science. In the course of her analysis, Whitted — a professor of English and African American studies at the University of South Carolina — breaks down a series of stories from the course of the company’s history, demonstrating that the “Entertaining Comics” could be more than just lurid and violent twist endings. Specifically, Whitted looks at the preachies, “socially conscious stories that boldly challenged the conservatism
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How CAPTAIN MARVEL Pulled Off That Third Act Twist

This article contains full spoilers for Captain Marvel.   There’s a particular trick we see in a lot of Disney or Disney-affiliated movies these days, going back to the early Aughts, when Pixar was becoming the name of the game when it came to mainstream, “all-ages entertainment that is actually good for all ages” films and their playbook began being widely disseminated throughout the movie industry. I’m sure there’s a proper name for this particular trick, but I’ll refer to them here as Trapdoor Villains. A trapdoor villain is a bad guy who is presented to us as a benevolent, upstanding
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CINEPUNX Episode 94: LOVE (’15) and CLIMAX(’18)- Our Gaspar Noe Episode

http://media.blubrry.com/cinepunx/p/www.cinepunx.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Cinepunx_Ep94.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSSHERE WE GO AGAIN WITH ANOTHER SICK ROUND OF CINEPUNX! We hope you are as unbelievably excited as we are to bring this action packed episode! On this contentious installment we get INTO IT talking about French provocateur Gaspar Noe. Is he good? Is he bad? Is he a misunderstood artist, an annoying edge Lord, or a gimmick utilizing scammer or ALL OF THE ABOVE? Get ready for a ton of opinions and almost no answer here on our 94th episode! We spend a chunk of time gushing
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SPECIAL EVENT: STARFISH Screening and Q&A w/ Director Al White

CINEPUNX AND YELLOW VEIL PICTURES PRESENT THE PHILADELPHIA PREMIERE OF STARFISH, THE HAUNTING FEATURE FILM DEBUT FROM A.T. WHITE Join us on March 18 for a screening at the historic Rotunda with director A.T. White in attendance for a post-screening Q&A. Philadelphia, PA (March 4, 2019) – Cinepunx and Yellow Veil Pictures are proud to present the Philadelphia premiere of Fantastic Fest-selected Starfish, the ambitious, genre-defying debut from writer and director A.T. White. For this special event, Cinepunx and Yellow Veil Pictures are excited to partner with the historic Rotunda in Philadelphia. The Rotunda (4014 Walnut St.) is a shared
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NOTHING TO DO: An Honest Look at Family Pathologies, Grief and Human Vulnerability

“What happens when you can’t stand the way your sibling does just about anything, but you’re forced to be with them during your father’s last days on Earth?” Upon reading that sentence, I was fully intrigued to watch this film because of my own personal experiences with sibling rivalry and the consistent quest of alleviating it. From the beginning, Nothing to Do showcases the honest and conflicting truth of dealing with the death of a loved one. It also brings up the inevitability of having to be around people you wouldn’t otherwise because of familial bonds. The leading character, Kenny (Paul Fahrenkopf),
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