Monthly Archives October 2019

Cine-Ween: THE GIVEAWAY!!

HAPPY HALLOWEEN ALL YOU CINEPHILES, FILM GEEKS, MOVIE PUNKS, AND ART THUGS OUT THERE! Thanks yo each and every one of you who has been keeping up with our many guest posts for the season, and thanks of course to all those who have lent us their voice as part of our celebration of the greatest time of the year! WITHOUT YOU ALL WE DO NOT EXIST! Now, if any of you have seen the amazing videos Jacob did to help promote Cine-Ween then you know that we have not delivered on all of our promises for the season. The
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Cine-Ween: Jillian Rae’s Rob Zombie-inspired video for ‘Buried Alive’ (PREMIERE)

We were big fans of Jillian Rae’s LP, I can’t be the one you want me to be, when it came out earlier this year, so it’s really exciting to premiere her Rob Zombie-inspired video for the album’s track, “Buried Alive” as part of our Cine-Ween coverage. As Jillian says: “‘Buried Alive’ is basically the product of what happens when my bottled-up stress, empathy, and anxiety exploded… all over my voice memos in a 4am insomnia-based writing session. This whole record has underlying themes of dealing with anxiety, mental health issues, staying sane, the quest of finding balance, and ultimately
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CINE-WEEN: It Isn’t FOR Them

Running a google search for the two words ‘Halloween’ and ‘capitalism’ returns well over six million results. Especially in the United States where the commercialization of Halloween has reached its apotheosis, the conservative right love to trot out a tired clichéd argument about how this time of year is a great way of teaching your kids about the accumulation of commodities (candy bars and the surplus value of labour being apparently equivalent). However, all of this is nonsense and it is not because we should not be politicizing a fun holiday. Rather the capitalist ideology around Halloween has to resisted precisely
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BROOKLYN HORROR FILM FESTIVAL: A Review Of THE SHED

Contrary to popular belief, horror films tackling social issues is nothing new. George Romero was unabashedly open about the social commentary of his films, and John Carpenter did little to veil his criticism of Reagan-era politics during the ‘80s. Recently, filmmakers such as Jordan Peele have taken the reins of such a movement, but not all the movies serving as allegory for a deeper message are such mainstream hits as Get Out. Frank Sabatella’s The Shed is one such entry in the long, storied history of horror being used as a vehicle for social criticism. The Shed is, at its
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CINE-WEEN: I’M JUST F*CKING WITH YOU – AN ANALYSIS OF TROLLING

I am a typical horror movie snob, turning my nose up at most Hollywood regurgitations of classics and so-called innovative concepts in modern horror, so impressing me with a recent or current film is often a difficult task. However, I was no less than completely refreshed and excited by Hulu’s I’m Just F*cking With You. The movie begins by introducing Larry (Keir O’Donnell), the main character and what patriarchal society would classify as a “beta male.” He is a neat-freak and stereotypical passive aggressive male loner (read: incel vibes) with a shy demeanor and antagonistic outlook on life. Larry does not
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Cine-Ween: Dan Curtis: King of TV Horror

In the pantheon of what might be called “classical” horror/monster movies, the conversation often boils down to two cycles: the Universal Monsters films of the 1920s-1950s, and the horror output of Hammer Film Productions from the 1950s-1970s. Allowances might be made for Val Lewton’s horror cycle at RKO in the 1940s, although the almost noirish style of those films (as well as their emphasis on the psychological over the supernatural) set them apart. However, if we broaden our scope to include television, then a third cycle enters the conversation more or less contemporaneous to Hammer. Building on the success of
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RED LETTER DAY: A Review

The concepts of ‘morality under duress’ and other people being essentially unknowable have a long and storied history in horror. After all, what could be scarier than not knowing for sure how everyday people, your friends, your family, your coworkers, or even yourself, would act when the chips are down and whatever checks that keep us adhering to the social construct are done away with, and nothing is quite black and white, but a murky gray. Stories like Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery” have persevered over time because they revolve around one simple concept: is the morality that keeps civilization together
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