Monthly Archives October 2019

Cine-Ween: Sequel Harvest: The CHILDREN OF THE CORN Series

Following the successful 1984 theatrical release of the Stephen King short story adaptation Children of the Corn, which earned nearly 15 million dollars domestic on an eight-hundred-thousand-dollar budget, we were treated to an onslaught of sequels, the majority of which were released direct-to-video. By a wide margin the longest-running feature film series based on King’s work, even the first film was not highly regarded by critics or even fans at the time of release. Still, its box office success would lead to one more theatrically released film in Children of the Corn II: The Final Sacrifice before another seven direct-to-video
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Cine-Ween: THE POLITICS AND HORROR OF PERFORMANCE IN SUSPIRIA (2018)

Something is rotten in the state of Germany. The idea of a darkness encroaching in on the world from the fringes exists in two parallel lines in Luca Guadagnino’s labyrinthine Suspiria (2018), which takes the “coven hiding in a dance academy” premise of Argento’s original and runs with it in all sort of new and strange directions. This darkness beating at the heart of Guadagnino’s film is one that’s animated by the act and art of performance: the performance of dance, of witchcraft, of political ideology; examining where these ideas converge and diverge, like an elaborate piece of choreography. By
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Cine-Ween: A Buyer’s Guide to Your Perfect Halloween Pet

You’re alone, creeping quietly through a graveyard when… no, wait. You’re in a haunted house, and suddenly, from behind the curtain… Actually, this time you’re in your own home, but now your family member is possessed! On the other hand, maybe you were bitten and you’re just not healing the way you should be… Well who can’t relate to all that? What you’ll quickly realize, however, is that all those and so many more scenarios can be improved, if not outright solved, by having a furry (or feathered, or scaly) friend by your side. Think about it: From Muffin, the
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Cine-Ween: Finding Hope in Horror

“Fairy tales are more than true: not because they tell us that dragons exist, but because they tell us that dragons can be beaten.” -Neil Gaiman (If you see a movie title here, that movie’s probably getting spoiled) A funny thing happened a little while back. I was on my couch watching Satoshi Kon’s seminal anime horror film Perfect Blue, a first time viewing for yours truly. Perfect Blue’s reputation proceeded it as one of the classics of anime and one of the great modern animated films, a psychological thriller so accomplished that Darren Aronofsky bought the remake rights just
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Brooklyn Horror Film Fest: THE YELLOW NIGHT has potential, but never quite reaches it

Director Ramon Porto Mota’s film, The Yellow Night, had its North American premiere at Brooklyn Horror Fest, and I’m really curious to see what the discussion is, once more people see it. The Brazilian film’s only had a couple of festival screenings thus far, and it seems like there’s a lot to unpack around it. “A group of teenagers arrive in the middle of the night to a desolate Brazilian seaside town. High school has just ended and they are ready to party in style, but cell service sucks and, as the days progress, things get very weird. Is time
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Cine-Ween: THE VILLAIN OF A THOUSAND MASKS

In early 1946, the town of Texarkana, Texas, was terrorized by a series of violent assaults and murders. Young couples parked at secluded lanes were accosted by a pistol-wielding figure – the first couple survived and escaped; the second and third were brutally executed. Town stores sold out of guns and ammunition. Doors were locked at night. Hot-blooded young vigilantes would pose as parking lovers in the hopes of luring the killer in for execution. The crimes were dubbed “The Texarkana Moonlight Murders” – one of the first serial killing sprees to capture the attention of the American mass media.
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Brooklyn Horror Film Fest: Phil ‘C.M. Punk’ Brooks talks his feature debut, GIRL ON THE THIRD FLOOR

Phil “CM Punk” Brooks is no stranger to acting, having been a professional wrestler for a decade and a half. He worked his way from indie Ring of Honor to the WWE minor leagues of Ohio Valley Wrestling, and ultimately became the WWE Champion. Anyone who ever watched him cut a promo knows that Brooks could create a character which effectively wrung emotions from the viewing public. What Brooks hasn’t done is play a character created by someone else, however. That changes with the release of Travis Stevens’ Girl on the Third Floor. It’s fitting that the athlete’s feature-length debut
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Brooklyn Horror Film Fest: KOKO-DI KOKO-DA is an experience unto itself

The Swedish / Danish film, Koko-Di Koko-Da, directed by Johannes Nyholm, and which screened yesterday at Brooklyn Horror Fest, is an entry into one of my favorite aspects of horror as of late: the movie which plays not so much with place or characters, but with how time can affect one’s perception of events: “In the wake of tragedy, married Elin and Tobias head out on the open road for a camping trip. But along the way, a group of homicidal deviants, propelled by the sounds of an ominous children’s song, disrupt their commute again and again—and again and again.
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