Monthly Archives March 2020

BOOKSHELF: Sam Firstenberg’s career with Cannon and beyond in STORIES FROM THE TRENCHES

Stories From The Trenches: Adventures In Making High Octane Hollywood Movies With Cannon Veteran Sam Firstenberg is a massive, massive book. It’s the size of an old-school, big city phone book, clocking in at 750 pages and weighing nearly five pounds. Consisting of interviews conducted by writer Marco Siedelmann with the director, as well as many of his collaborators – including Lucinda Dickey (Ninja III: The Domination), her Breakin’ 2: Electric Boogaloo co-stars Michael Chambers and Adolofo Quinones, and Michael Dudikoff (American Ninja), among many other writers, editors, and cameramen – it’s an exhaustive compendium of Firstenberg’s work. There are
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THIS JUSTIN: The King Is Dead, Long Live The King

    Welcome to THIS JUSTIN, a column dedicated to my love of all things weird and spooky. Each week I’ll be taking you on a deep dive into something creepy and/or crawly and talking your ear off about why I love it so much. Spoilers ahead! The history of horror literature in America can be broken down into three eras, each defined by the author who had the greatest impact in that era. First, we have Edgar Allen Poe — who ushered in an era of short stories and whose voice would be heard into the next century. Then,
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Olivia’s Retrospective of Films Seen at Glasgow Film Fest and FrightFest Glasgow

While serving as a staff member at the Glasgow Film Festival, I got plenty of opportunities to usher in several screenings, meaning I got to sample a lot of strange and interesting films that I can guarantee I probably wouldn’t have seen in a wider release. Since I’m still a film studies writer at heart, I’ve complied this little retrospective of every film I saw at the 2020 Glasgow Film Festival and FrightFest Glasgow, sharing my general thoughts and wisdom (and lack thereof). Here’s a few rules: With the exception of the Reflective Retrospective films I saw (in this case,
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CINEPUNX Episode 108: Von Sydow Tribute ( THE NIGHT VISITOR & THREE DAYS OF THE CONDOR)

http://media.blubrry.com/cinepunx/p/www.cinepunx.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/Cinepunx_ep108.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSSCINEPUNX CINEPUNX CINEPUNX HEY there weary traveler, come in and rest your bones to a brand new episode of Cinepunx! We are very likely the only brown, punk, film podcast in the world and if we are not, we challenge whoever you are to a dance off. On this plague season episode we are paying tribute to the work of the incomprable Max von Sydow by discussing two films of his we were previously unfamiliar with: The Night Visitor & Three Days of the Condor! Before that we
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FILMS FROM THE VOID: Paul Naschy’s THE BEAST AND THE MAGIC SWORD makes its U.S. debut

For their latest batch of releases, world-spanning company Mondo Macabro presents the debut Blu-ray release – and first-ever US release – of director Paul Naschy’s The Beast And The Magic Sword. Long desired by fans of the Spanish director’s series of Waldemar Daninsky werewolf films, this 1983 horror fantasy is an absolute knockout of a release. “THE BEAST AND THE MAGIC SWORD is the last great film from Spanish horror legend Paul Naschy. Although he would go on making and planning films until his death in 2009, he never again attempted the epic sweep and grandeur of this 10th entry
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FROM THE STEREO TO YOUR SCREEN: El DeBarge & SHORT CIRCUIT

“Who’s Johnny,” by El Debarge from Short Circuit DeBarge’s 1985 album, Rhythm of the Night, and its eponymous title track were smash hits. The album went gold and the song went to number five on the Billboard Hot 100, thanks in some part due to its inclusion on the soundtrack for The Last Dragon, released just a month and a half after the single itself. The group would peter out after the group’s lead singer, El, left the following year to release his self-titled debut solo release on Motown subsidiary Gordy. The first track and lead single from that album,
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CINEPUNX Episode 107: THE KILLER & BULLET IN THE HEAD- A John Woo Double Feature

http://media.blubrry.com/cinepunx/p/www.cinepunx.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/Cinepunx_Ep107.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSSHELLO FRIEND, SO GLAD YOU COULD JOIN US FOR ANOTHER SPECTACULAR ADVENTURE WITH CINEPUNX! On this, our 107th episode we decided to spend some time with one of the greats of action cinema, JOHN WOO! We talk about all of his movies and our history with them, but spend most of our time two of his later Hong Kong films before he broke through in the US, The Killer and Bullet in the Head. We would love to say more, but that is about it. Some links of
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FAIL-SAFE Criterion Collection blu-ray Review

By the time Sidney Lumet’s taut nuclear war drama Fail-Safe was released in US theaters in October of 1964, the world had already been treated to Stanley Kubrick’s wry comedy about the very same topic, Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb. Both films were made by New York born filmmakers, then in their thirties, with acclaimed bodies of work already amassed (with Lumet coming off of The Pawnbroker and Kubrick off of Lolita). And despite the similarities of their creators, the films couldn’t be more different even if their ultimate messages are aligned.
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Analog Adventures: Looking at ORG Music

I get a lot of random records, tapes, and books in the mail, because publicists forget that outlets for which I used to work aren’t around anymore, or someone finds the address hidden on my website, or… whatever. This is a way to keep them from piling up uselessly in the corner of the office. ORG Music announced their 2020 Record Store Day titles last week. Out on Saturday, April 18, will be Nat Turner Rebellion’s Laugh to Keep from Crying, Würm’s Poison b/w Zero Sum, Sock-Tight’s self-titled LP, a brand-new Infectious Grooves EP, Marion Brown’s Porto Novo, and a
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EARTH GIRLS ARE EASY & The Defense of the Dumb Slut

Contemporary reviews to the 1989 Cult Classic EARTH GIRLS ARE EASY are, politely, not terribly kind. Cult Classics are, as a rule, not appreciated when they’re released. Some reviewers, like Roger Ebert, sort of got it off the bat calling the film “lighthearted and goofy”; others miss the proverbial pool float entirely, harping on the vapidity of Geena Davis’s Valerie and her air-headed boss, Candy, played by the film’s co-writer Julie Brown. That Valerie is, frankly, an idiot is the film’s entire point. Davis herself is so smart– literally, she’s in MENSA– that she plays the affable dimwit with the
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