Monthly Archives October 2020

CINE-WEEN: THE MORTUARY COLLECTION Is Your Next Favorite Halloween Treat

In justifying why his adaptation of the Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark book series would not be an anthology, as the books had always been, Guillermo del Toro spoke critically of the anthology format, saying, “An anthology is only as good as its weakest segment. It’s never as good as its best segment.” While that statement is…debatable (I feel like horror fans are more likely to revere a film for the cherry-picked best moments/segments and simply shrug off the weaker parts. For fuck’s sake, Trilogy of Terror is still listed as a classic and virtually the entire planet
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NIGHTSTREAM: Come True Is A Surreal And Nightmarish Experience

Sleep as a source of horror is nothing new. Freddy Krueger is one of the most iconic characters of the last forty years in film and has become somewhat defanged over the years, but what he represents (something from the realm of sleep being able to kill you) is arguably one of the most frightening ideas we can imagine. There’s something primordial about a fear of dreams in general, something archetypical. In the words of favorite songsmith of the youth of today Billie Eilish, “when we all fall asleep, where do we go?” Anthony Scott Burns’ Come True puts this
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CINE-WEEN: Scare Package Is A Meta-Horror Joy

Created by Aaron B. Koontz and Cameron Burns of Paper Street Pictures, and directed by Emily Hagins, Chris McInroy, Noah Segan, Courtney and Hillary Andujar, Anthony Cousins, Baron Vaughn, and Koontz (who all co-wrote the film with Frank Garcia-Hejl, Ben Fee, and John Karsko), the new anthology film Scare Package feels less like a collective effort, and more like a grand, cohesive vision. “In Scare Package, Chad Buckley is a lonely Horror aficionado, spending his days overseeing a struggling video store and arguing with his only customer, Sam. When an unsuspecting job applicant arrives, Chad sets out to teach him
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NIGHTSTREAM: Rose Plays Julie Is A Warning On Digging Into The Past

In Mike Mignola’s Hellboy comic universe, the titular character is notoriously hesitant on exploring his origin. On one hand, the fact that he’s an actual demon means he might uncover some truly horrific shit that he’d rather just stay in the dark about. But, on the other, he sees no need to find out about his birth parents because to him he already knows the only man that matters to him as a father. To Anung Un Rama, Trevor Bruttenholm is his father. Not the man who raised him, not his adoptive father…just his father. That’s all he needs to
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CINE-WEEN: THE TEXAS CHAINSAW POLITIC

My peers in show choir introduced me to the world of classic horror films. It was my first year in show choir and for the week of Halloween, we would go to a different members house and watch two horror flicks. It was that week in 2001, that I was introduced to The Ice Cream Man, IT, Halloween, Evil Dead and the Texas Chain Saw Massacre. I savored each one and had a few nightmares. I loved how horror films created their own worlds full of monsters, killers, and masked maniacs.   It took me several years though to realize
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NIGHTSTREAM: RUN Is A Hitchcockian Thriller And Then Some

I think one of the things a lot of us believe growing up is that in general our parents know what’s best for us and usually act in a way that promotes our best interest. Sure, we might get pissy when we’re asked to do the dishes. And yes, it sucks that we can’t go out with our friends to a football game on Friday night because we have to stay home and watch our little sister. But as a whole, I think it’s reasonable to say that our parents usually know the deal. In Run, Aneesh Chagnaty asks simply
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NIGHTSTREAM: 32 Malasana St. Is Nothing That Hasn’t Already Been Done

One of the oldest settings in horror films, arguably the oldest setting, is the haunted house. You can picture the archetypical structure: usually a run-down Victorian mansion, boarded up and in disrepair, with a colorful and vague history of spooky events. Haunted house movies have survived the changing of horror trends, moving from Vincent Price classics up through The Amityville Horror and Tobe Hooper’s (or Steven Spielberg’s…we won’t go there right now) tour de force Poltergeist. Even films like The Shining and Evil Dead are a variation on the theme. It’s a classic and reliable setting to work with when
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NIGHTSTREAM: Bleed With Me Takes A Deep Dive Into Mental Illness

Few things are more frightening than not being able to trust your own perception of reality. Here at Cinepunx and Horror Business, films that deal with mental illness, such as  The Swerve, Jacob’s Ladder, and They Look Like People, are held in high regard and we understand that dealing with such issues may turn daily life into a living hell. That’s why I was immediately interested in checking out Amelia Moses’ Bleed With Me. Bleed With Me is a tightly focused story about three people vacationing at a cabin in the snowy Canadian mountains: Emily, her boyfriend Brendan, and her
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CINE-WEEN: A From The Stereo To Your Screen Triptych Of Terror

“Fright Night” by the J. Geils Band from Fright Night “Teenage Charley Brewster (William Ragsdale) is a horror-film junkie, so it’s no surprise that, when a reclusive new neighbor named Jerry Dandridge (Chris Sarandon) moves next-door, Brewster becomes convinced he is a vampire. It’s also no surprise when nobody believes him. However, after strange events begin to occur, Charlie has no choice but to turn to the only person who could possibly help: washed-up television vampire killer Peter Vincent (Roddy McDowall).” Superior to both “Centerfold” and “Freeze Frame,” and on-par with “Love Stinks,” the J. Geils Band’s theme song for
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NIGHTSTREAM: An Unquiet Grave Is A Harsh Look At Mourning Gone Wrong

Grief is, despite being one of the most painful emotions in the spectrum, a sign of something good. It means that you cared for something so deeply that its loss is painful to you, and ultimately, I think that to feel something like that is beautiful. In time, grief slowly gestates into something not quite as sharp, something that rather than feeling like razors laying us open instead feels like an old break in your arm on a rainy day; a dull ache, a reminder of a past pain, but a reminder of how far we’ve come. On occasion, however,
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