Posts by Adrianna Gober

Women in Horror Month: Discovering WHAT METAL GIRLS ARE INTO With Laurel Vail

Women in Horror Month (WiHM) is an international, grassroots initiative, which encourages supporters to learn about and showcase the underrepresented work of women in the horror industries. Whether they are on the screen, behind the scenes, or contributing in their other various artistic ways, it is clear that women love, appreciate, and contribute to the horror genre. More information is available at the WiHM website.   It’s a setup sure to be familiar to genre-savvy viewers: a group of friends decide to get away for a weekend and wind up somewhere curiously isolated. The locals don’t exactly give them a
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The Pasolini Project: A Journey Into Pasolini, PART 1: ACCATTONE

One of the most exciting, stimulating, and fulfilling aspects of film appreciation lies in the journey of discovery it often entails. This journey encompasses a variety of experiences, from the personal — the anxious thrill of taking a chance on an unfamiliar film on the strength of its cover art, or a long-desired Holy Grail finally appearing within reach — to the communal; that familiar, transportive act of sitting in a packed theater and immersing ourselves, together, in another place and time. Film industry trends might shift, and formats might fade into obsolescence as the ways to watch movies continue
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Hardcore Dedication: Freddy Alva Talks URBAN STYLES, Comics and More Ahead of Philadelphia Book Signing

New York City’s celebrated status as a major cultural epicenter where all voices and cultures converge has long been cemented. Its reputation as a haven for underground art and music is particularly hallowed, given its role in the birth of American punk rock. When it comes to hardcore, however, New York City is often eclipsed by San Francisco and Washington, DC in the minds of the masses. After all, it wasn’t until Bad Brains relocated to the city in the early 80s that a hardcore scene even began to emerge. By mid-decade, however, New York City hardcore was alive and
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BAT PUSSY Bounces Onto Blu-Ray, Tramples Our Libidos

For certain cinephiles, there’s a sacred joy in wading deep into the muck and mire of trash cinema to emerge — triumphant — with a story to tell. Chalk it up to the deeply satisfying thrill of stumbling upon something wild and weird, exchanging notes with fellow travelers, and basking in the validation of the experience. The primo fodder for these bonding rituals are the kinds of movies so unusual, astoundingly inept or bugfuck absurd they must be seen to be believed. Bat Pussy hits all the marks. The history of Bat Pussy is fittingly strange and obscure, though not
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REEL COOL: Exhumed Films Presents 3-Dementia! Coming to You in Glorious Stereoscope

For 20 years, the good folks at Exhumed Films have worked tirelessly to bring unique, unforgettable live cinema experiences to horror, cult and exploitation fans in and around Philadelphia. On Sunday, July 16, cinephiles and horrorhounds will descend upon the Lightbox Film Center at International House Philadelphia for Exhumed Films Presents: 3-Dementia!, the group’s latest mind-bogglingly ambitious, carefully curated cinematic extravaganza. At this particular outing, Exhumed will unreel an eye-popping presentation so three-dimensionally bright you’ll have to wear (stereoscopic) shades. 3-Dementia will feature five unique 3D films from the 70s and 80s, screened from original, 35mm prints; selections range from
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REVIEW: BABY DRIVER Is a Full-Throttle, Musical Thrillride

Caution: This article contains mild spoilers.   After completing his much-beloved “Cornetto Trilogy” and venturing into the Marvel Cinematic Universe with ­­Ant-Man, writer/director Edgar Wright turned his attention to the Great Cinematic Car Chase. The result, Baby Driver, races into theaters this Wednesday, June 28. In many ways, this is Wright at the top of his game, bringing us his tightest, most cohesive and technically impressive film. It’s jam-packed with explosive action sequences, ambitious stunts and at just under two hours, doesn’t feel a second too long. And like many of his films, it introduces an unconventional protagonist we can’t
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Mining THE ARCHIVE: Exploring Vinegar Syndrome’s New Brick and Mortar Store [+ Interview With Brandon Upson and James Neurath of Vinegar Syndrome]

  In the seaport city of Bridgeport, Connecticut, nestled unassumingly in a strip of buildings on an ordinary stretch of road, you’ll find The Archive. It’s a nondescript storefront in an ordinary location, unremarkable from the outside. Open the door, however, and you’ll enter a genre film wonderland. The Archive is a brand-new movie, music and culture shop from the team behind Vinegar Syndrome, film restoration and distribution company and stalwart champions of cult and exploitation home video. This past weekend, they celebrated the store’s soft opening, and I was on-hand to check it out. Photo courtesy of The Archive
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REVIEW: Wonder Woman Lassos Up a Win

This review contains some spoilers. “Be careful of mankind, Diana, they do not deserve you.” These are some of the last words spoken by Hippolyta, Queen of the Amazons, before watching her daughter sail away from her forever, and into the uncertain future of Man’s World. Mankind, and whether it deserves saving, is a question central to the heart of Patty Jenkins’ Wonder Woman and cuts to the very core of what the character represents. When psychologist and women’s rights advocate William Moulton Marston created Wonder Woman in 1941, he did so with a specific aim in mind. Literature, he thought,
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Review – DAVID LYNCH: THE ART LIFE

The life of the artist is frequently envied and romanticized. Turn back the pages of most history books, and you’ll find the artist has been looked to for social critique, entertainment and insight for thousands of years, fulfilling an important function in society. Given this role, it’s no surprise that films about artists hold a lot of interest. The life of the film auteur has been enjoying particular focus in recent years; from Hitchcock/Truffaut to De Palma to the upcoming Never-Ending Man: Hayao Miyazaki, cinematic journeys into the lives and methodologies of celebrated filmmakers prove to enthrall and entertain. On
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Now You’ll Pay the Penalty: The Wonderfully Weird Work of Fletcher Hanks

For most comic book fans, there is little question that the traditions and conventions that came to define Western superhero comics can be traced back to The Golden Age, a period generally considered to have begun with the first appearance of Superman in Action Comics #1 in 1938, and which lasted until (roughly) the early 1950s. During this period, comic books emerged as a developing industry, bolstered and popularized by heroic characters that tapped into the fears, anxieties, hopes, and dreams of a culture. With America still pulling out of the Great Depression and the threat of war looming ever nearer, comics
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