Posts by Ben Leonard

In Theaters:20th CENTURY WOMEN

20th Century Women reportedly tells the tales of the three women from three generations in the late 1970s. However, the film spends the first half hour building the story around the life of a young man. I was starting to get antsy in my seat, annoyed that I was watching another “story about women”, written and directed by a man, Mike Mills, that is told from the viewpoint of a male character. Thankfully, the remaining hour and a half proved me wrong. The story is a fairly straight-forward character study with no big twists and turns. Dorothea, played by Annette
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In Theaters: MORGAN

From its Silent Hill styled introduction, I knew Luke Scott‘s Morgan was going to have a “twist” and within ten minutes I knew what it was. Don’t worry, there’s no spoilers in this review. I went in to this film having only read a synopsis. It seemed like something in the vein of Ex Machina but with less tech and more horror. Unfortunately, the first half played out as a slow and methodical drama with some convoluted attempts at becoming a suspense/mystery. It did finish with some blood, gore and chase scenes, but the film never really found its niche.
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In Theaters: OUR LITTLE SISTER-Kind, But Not Useless

At 128 minutes, Hirokazu Koreeda’s subtitled family drama Our Little Sister may, on paper, seem like a long runtime, but the Ozu-styled story plays out perfectly. Koreeda has had a diverse career since the early 90’s with such titles as Maborosi, After Life and Air Doll. This film stars Haruka Ayase, known for her title role in Ichi, as Sachi Kôda, 29,  the career focused older sister of care-free Yoshino, 22, played by Masami Nagasawa, and tom-boy Chika,19, played by Kaho. The three young women live their own lives at work and socially but come together as a family in their deceased grandmother’s old, but bustling, home.
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In Theaters: SWISS ARMY MAN

Honestly, the biggest draw of The Daniels’ Swiss Army Man was a chance to watch the mopey teen from Little Miss Sunshine riding the corpse of Harry Potter around like it was some sort of quidditch match on the sea. The film does indeed pay-off in this respect, but not much more than what we’ve all seen in the trailers. The film opens with a near suicidal Hank, played by Paul Dano, stranded and lonely on a beach. Just as Hank is about to end it all, he sees a body, Daniel Radcliffe, wash-up on the shore. Hoping that he
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