Posts by La Virgen

(CINE-WEEN) Disposable Vanity: EYES WITHOUT A FACE and Beauty 

The hauntingly beautiful and mesmerizing 1960 film Eyes Without a Face, directed by Georges Franju, is a timeless horror classic that has drawn from classics like Frankenstein and has inspired countless films like Pedro Almodóvar’s 2011 film The Skin I Live In that deal with identity, rebirth, the male gaze and mutilation. Georges Franju had made his mark as a documentary filmmaker with his 1949 documentary, Blood of the Beasts documenting the brutal reality of slaughterhouses in Paris. In many ways the brutality of reality translates into Eyes Without a Face, a candid depiction of the cost of beauty, disposability
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Guerillas, Violencia y Fantasmas Que Vuelven: TIGERS ARE NOT AFRAID Review

Tigers Are Not Afraid/ Vuelven, directed by Issa López is a film that centers around a group of kids who have sought shelter among the ruins of a town infected by gang violence. After Estrella’s mother goes missing and is presumed dead she joins the local boys gang of orphaned children. El Shine, the group’s leader, is hesitant at first to accept Estrella. The boys have not only dealt with familial trauma but loss of their own due to the local gang members known as Los Huascas . Shine states that women bring bad luck but pressures Estrella to murder
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FRANKENHOOKER: Camp, Sex Work, and Toxic Masculinity

Frank Henenlotter’s 1990 comedy horror cult classic, Frankenhooker, is a campy spin on Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein in which Jeffrey, a failed med student, reanimates his recently beheaded fiance, Elizabeth, after a freak accident. Jeffrey, who is part mad scientist and part obsessive lover, concocts a plan to build Elizabeth a new body, attach her severed head and revive her so they can be reunited. After making a deal with Zoro the pimp, Jeffrey chooses his desired parts from branded prostitutes, hoping for a big payday. After they literally explode from super crack, he’s able to rebuild and revive Elizabeth. Elizabeth
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Undermining the Patriarchy and Fascism: Ana in THE SPIRIT OF THE BEEHIVE

As the barren landscape for Victor Erice’s Spirit of the Beehive/El Espiritu de la Colmena (1976) is investigated in the film’s opening shots, a subtle icon in front of a building of a small, Spanish village immediately reveals its connection to Francoist Spain. Five overlapped, vertically upright arrows with a bow across the middle that serve as a clear indication of Filangism (a conservative, pro-Franco ideology). They are planted on the side of a wall as the camera creeps further into the village as its inhabitants gather to see James Whale’s 1931 adaptation of Frankenstein. A young Ana is mystified
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