Posts by Nick Spacek

From the Stereo to Your Screen: Digital Underground and Nothing But Trouble

“Same Song” by Digital Underground, from Nothing But Trouble         Y’know what’s weird about this video? Digital Underground’s performance in Nothing But Trouble of “Same Song” is, essentially, a music video, and actually kind of better than the video itself. It’s certainly less racially problematic than the video itself, despite the fact that the members of Digital Underground are basically the only people of color in the film at all. That’s a lot to unload right at the top, isn’t it? Let’s backtrack: Nothing But Trouble is a 1991 movie starring John Candy, Chevy Chase, and Demi
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From the Stereo to Your Screen: Digital Underground and Nothing But Trouble

“Same Song” by Digital Underground, from Nothing But Trouble         Y’know what’s weird about this video? Digital Underground’s performance in Nothing But Trouble of “Same Song” is, essentially, a music video, and actually kind of better than the video itself. It’s certainly less racially problematic than the video itself, despite the fact that the members of Digital Underground are basically the only people of color in the film at all. That’s a lot to unload right at the top, isn’t it? Let’s backtrack: Nothing But Trouble is a 1991 movie starring John Candy, Chevy Chase, and Demi
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From the Stereo to Your Screen: Digital Underground and Nothing But Trouble

“Same Song” by Digital Underground, from Nothing But Trouble         Y’know what’s weird about this video? Digital Underground’s performance in Nothing But Trouble of “Same Song” is, essentially, a music video, and actually kind of better than the video itself. It’s certainly less racially problematic than the video itself, despite the fact that the members of Digital Underground are basically the only people of color in the film at all. That’s a lot to unload right at the top, isn’t it? Let’s backtrack: Nothing But Trouble is a 1991 movie starring John Candy, Chevy Chase, and Demi
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From the Stereo to Your Screen: The Coupe De Villes and Big Trouble in Little China

“Big Trouble in Little China” by The Coupe De Villes from Big Trouble in Little China     I’m never putting the column’s selection up to a vote ever again. While I absolutely adore John Carpenter’s music, as well as Big Trouble In Little China as a film, this song is horrid. I’m pretty sure everyone either voted on this because of one of two things: They knew the movie, but had no idea about the song. They knew the song and wanted me to suffer. Knowing you people, I’m assuming the second, more than the first. This song’s rough.
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Films from the Void: THE SENTINEL

FILMS FROM THE VOID is a journey through junk bins, late night revivals, under seen recesses and reject piles as we try to find forgotten gems and lesser known classics. Join us as we lose our minds sorting through the strange, the sleazy, the sincere and the slop from the past and try to make sense of it all. The Sentinel I’ll be honest up front, here: the first time I watched The Sentinel, I was really tired and trying to do a million things around the house. The second time, I had kinda / sorta broken my foot and
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Films from the Void: METAMORPHOSIS

FILMS FROM THE VOID is a journey through junk bins, late night revivals, under seen recesses and reject piles as we try to find forgotten gems and lesser known classics. Join us as we lose our minds sorting through the strange, the sleazy, the sincere and the slop from the past and try to make sense of it all. Metamorphosis Metamorphosis is, at its heart, a nasty movie. It’s part of an ad hoc collection of films known in Italy as the La Casa series, playing off the popularity of the Evil Dead films — known in Italy as La
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From the Stereo to Your Screen: The Dickies and Killer Klowns From Outer Space

“Killer Klowns From Outer Space” by the Dickies from Killer Klowns From Outer Space   This is, quite honestly, one of my favorite songs of all time. Any chance I have to work it onto a compilation, mix tape, radio show, podcast, or otherwise, I will foist it upon those listening. Not only is it the theme to an excellently underrated movie, but it’s probably the best punk song to ever use “Entry of the Gladiators” as its backbone. Granted, it’s probably the only punk song to use the circus calliope as its backbone, but still — fantastically catchy song. The
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From the Stereo to Your Screen: The Ramones and Pet Sematary

  “Pet Sematary” by the Ramones from Pet Sematary It’s only taken half a dozen videos and a couple of months, but here we are finally marrying punk rock and movies in this column. Granted, late ‘80s Ramones is probably about as punk as a Clash t-shirt you bought at Urban Outfitters, but we do what we can. “Pet Sematary” was written for the movie adaptation of the Stephen King novel of the same name — which I didn’t even know until I started watching the video for this column. It’s weird to think that the Ramones — punk rock progenitors
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From the Stereo to Your Screen: Bobby Brown and Ghostbusters II

“On Our Own” by Bobby Brown from Ghostbusters II     The video for Bobby Brown’s “On Our Own” is a textbook case of how music videos from films sometimes use the slimmest of connections in order to sell a movie. Watching the video, it seems like the director shot two different ideas for the song — one for the song before it was attached to the film, and the other afterward — and then stitched them together as best he could. Visually, it’s a far cry from Ray Parker Jr.’s “Ghostbusters,” from the first film, which featured all four Ghostbusters,
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From the Stereo to Your Screen: Oingo Boingo and Weird Science

“Weird Science” by Oingo Boingo from Weird Science       It only seems natural that Danny Elfman would end up doing film scores, given the number of times his Los Angeles psychotic cabaret act, Oingo Boingo, had their music appear in films during the ‘80s. Their appearance in Back to School doing “Dead Man’s Party” is one of that movie’s more iconic scenes, and they’re all over the soundtrack to 1984’s Bachelor Party, also appearing in the film itself. However, it’s the title track for the 1985 sci-fi comedy, Weird Science, with which I identify the band cinematically. The
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