Posts by Nick Spacek

Kansas City’s Inner Altar Melds Hardcore’s Bite With Occult Rock Theatricality

This Friday, January 18, sees the release of the debut full-length from Kansas City’s Inner Altar, via the Company. Titled Vol III, the nine-track album takes the sound the band’s been honing for several years and really brings all of the disparate influences together, keeping a sense of space-rocking openness, while eschewing the rough-and-tumble looseness that dominated their previous EPs. I described it a couple of weeks back as “Danzig by way of the Cult, playing in a big, raucous warehouse,” when the video for “Lives of Fire” dropped, but the Company’s Joshua Wilkinson did an even better job of
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ANALOG ADVENTURES: Taking Back Sunday and Paul Jacks

I get a lot of random records, tapes, and books in the mail, because publicists forget that outlets for which I used to work aren’t around anymore, or someone finds the address hidden on my website, or… whatever. This is a way to keep them from piling up uselessly in the corner of the office. Taking Back Sunday – Twenty (Craft Recordings) Per the label, “Twenty is a career-to-date retrospective, celebrating 20 years of Taking Back Sunday. The collection spans each of their studio albums; Tell All Your Friends, Where You Want To Be, Louder Now, New Again, Taking Back Sunday,
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Talking Her Career (and That Amazing CUTTING CLASS Interview) With Jill Schoelen

In the late ’80s and early ’90s, the films of actress Jill Schoelen were readily available in the horror section of any self-respecting video store: The Stepfather, Cutting Class, Popcorn, and When A Stranger Calls Back, to name the highlights. However, as VHS waned and DVD began to make its ascent, most of these flicks were issued only as bare-bones discs, if at all, and went out of print fairly soon thereafter. Happily, in the last few years, fans have seen deluxe Blu-ray editions with restored prints and tons of extras make their way to the marketplace. Synapse kicked everything
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BOOKSHELF: Richard Lloyd’s EVERYTHING IS COMBUSTIBLE Burns With Fascinating Stories

Richard Lloyd is not Richard Hell. Richard Hell was born Richard Lester Meyers, and he was the other guitarist in Television; Lloyd’s the one who stuck it out. He was familiar with Led Zeppelin, Jimi Hendrix, John Lee Hooker, and more of the icons of late ’60s rock ‘n’ roll guitar god suchness. Now that that’s out of the way, on to his memoirs. How do you review a book like Everything Is Combustible: Television, CBGB’s and Five Decades of Rock and Roll? It’s linear (at times), sure, and definitely works in the memoir style, wherein Lloyd relates tales of
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Cinepunx’s Best of 2018

It’s the Best Movies and Music of 2018, as determined by your friends at Cinepunx. Because we’re egalitarian as hell, we not only let everyone determine their own lists, we let them determine their own awards, and — throwing all caution to the wind — we even invited friends of the site to join in the fun. It’s a goddamn end of the year free-for-all. Get at it below. TL;DR: People were really into First Reformed, Hereditary, Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, and Mandy, in terms of movies. For music, it was Tragedy’s Fury, Turnstile’s Time and Space, Janelle Monae’s Dirty
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Ho, Ho, Horror: All of the Seasonally Appropriate Genre Fare I Could Stomach

This year, it seems like Christmas is a time for killing in the horror genre. Over the last several weeks, I watched as many of 2018’s holiday horror releases as I could get my hands on, to the tune of a whopping eight films. In addition, I saw four seasonally appropriate releases in the theater. Lawrence’s Liberty Hall screened Black Christmas, and during the annual Nerds of Nostalgia podcast’s Christmas with the Nerds Triple Feature and Toy Drive, I caught Silent Night, Batman Returns, and The Long Kiss Goodnight. It’s been a bit of a slog, and I looked to
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DEATH HOUSE is Less ‘THE EXPENDABLES of Horror’ and Instead Completely Disposable

“During an exclusive tour, a power breakdown inside a secret prison known as the Death House sends two agents fighting through a labrynth of horrors while being pursued by a ruthless army of roaming inmates. As they fight to escape, the agents push toward the lowest depths of the facility where they learn a supernatural group of evil beings are their only chance for survival.” After years of build-up, the much-hyped and greatly-anticipated Death House — written by Gunnar Hansen and directed by Harrison Smith — dropped on VOD, Blu-ray, and DVD this week. The film has screened at festivals
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BOOKSHELF: BLOOD, FIRE, DEATH Gives a Human Face to Extreme Metal

It’s beginning to get cold and dark outside, so what better time of year for a reissue of Blood, Fire, Death: A Swedish Metal Story by Ika Johannesson and Jon Jefferson Klingberg? Originally released in 2011 as Blod, Eld, Död: En Svensk Metalhistoria by Alfabeta Bokförlag / Pocketförlaget, the Feral House edition, released early last month by Feral House, marks the English-language debut of this tome. It’s perfect that Feral House released this, actually, as Blood, Fire, Death rounds out a trilogy of books from the publisher on extreme music. First would be the seminal 1998 book, Lords of Chaos:
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FROM THE STEREO TO YOUR SCREEN: Bryan Ferry and LEGEND

“Is Your Love Strong Enough?” by Bryan Ferry from Legend Bryan Ferry was coming off a very good year when he had “Is Your Love Strong Enough?” featured in Ridley Scott’s 1986 dark fantasy film, Legend. 1985 had seen the release of his massive Boys and Girls album, which featured the hit singles “Slave to Love” and “Don’t Stop the Dance.” It was a UK number one album, and went gold in the United States as well. Per the Technicolor Dreams blog, “Ferry took an unused demo called ‘Circles’ from the Avalon sessions and adapted it into this haunting, memorable
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BAFF 2018: AMAZON HOT BOX Blends Every Women-in-Prison Movie Ever

“An American college student named Penny is erroneously apprehended during a dissident round-up in the banana republic of Rattica. She is incarcerated into the island penal system overseen by Wardress Von Krupp who is constructing the world’s greatest information extractor. Crocodiles, religious zealots, psycho inmates and voodoo-based experiments block her every escape. Life is cheap and the jungle explodes in Amazon Hot Box.” Director James Bickert follows up his mad scientist/biker picture Frankenstein Created Bikers with the relatively straightforward women-in-prison homage Amazon Hot Box. The big deal about this movie is that it was evidently shot in secret, then unleashed
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