Archives for In Theaters

Inspiration, Creation and Sharing: VARDA BY AGNES Review

At the start of Agnes Varda’s final film, Varda By Agnes, she sits before a captive audience and lists off the three words that “guide” her life and work: Inspiration, Creation and Sharing. Even if you’re coming to her work for the first time with this film, it’s easy to see where each word fits into her body of work as well as her spirited and humbling outlook on life. Assembled through footage from a series of live audience talks that Varda gave regarding her career as well as numerous clips from her films and other fun surprises, Varda By
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Ka Is A Wheel: A Review Of DOCTOR SLEEP

There’s a scene in Magnolia where Phillip Baker Hall, suffering from cancer with only a few months to live, tells a colleague “the Book says we might be through with the past, but the past ain’t through with us.” In other words we might think we’ve conquered our demons but trauma is something we own, and what we own always comes home. We are currently in the midst of something akin to a renaissance for Stephen King. For the past few years, it feels like there’s a new adaption of one of his works for TV or the big screen
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Guerillas, Violencia y Fantasmas Que Vuelven: TIGERS ARE NOT AFRAID Review

Tigers Are Not Afraid/ Vuelven, directed by Issa López is a film that centers around a group of kids who have sought shelter among the ruins of a town infected by gang violence. After Estrella’s mother goes missing and is presumed dead she joins the local boys gang of orphaned children. El Shine, the group’s leader, is hesitant at first to accept Estrella. The boys have not only dealt with familial trauma but loss of their own due to the local gang members known as Los Huascas . Shine states that women bring bad luck but pressures Estrella to murder
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IT: CHAPTER TWO, Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Float Down Here

As a massive Stephen King fan for most of my life, I understood Bill Skarsgård as Derry’s most infamous citizen when he lamented to the Loser’s Club that for 27 years, It dreamt of them; It missed them; It craved them. I get it. Ever since seeing the lackluster 1990 TV miniseries, I craved an adaption worthy of King’s magnum opus, something that captured the true weirdness of his prose and the cosmic scale of the novel. I dreamt of it. In 2017, we received Andy Muschietti’s IT, and finally, I saw, on the big screen, the characters I’d known
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PET SEMATARY (2019) Fails to Capture The Book’s Stony Heart

One of the most contested ideas within modern horror, among fans at least, is the remake. For some, these forays into nostalgia are sacrilege, failing often to honor the spirit of the original they are recreating. For others, they are evidence of how precious even degenerates like us, the horror community, can be about our memories; some succeed, some fail, but remakes in and of themselves are of no intrinsic value or fault. Honestly, there is truth in both ideas. Some remakes really do improve upon the original, or if not improve, try something new and different that adds something
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Neon Indian’s Alan Palomo On His Score For the Hypnotically Repulsive RELAXER

Writer/director Joel Potrykus’ new film, Relaxer, is simultaneously hypnotic and repulsive. It all takes place in one room — on one couch, really — where Abbie (Joshua Burge) is attempting to beat 256 levels of Pac-Man, because he’s not allowed to get up until he does so. If this movie had a smell, it would be sweat on a vinyl couch, with a faint whiff of sour milk somewhere in the background. Y2K’s on the horizon, and a sense of mild panic is palpable. If The Greasy Strangler left you uncomfortable, Relaxer will have you cringing. And, yet, the film
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