Archives for Scene Report

CINEPOCALYPSE 2019: VILLAINS Might Not Stick the Landing, But the Run-Up is Perfection

“Mickey and Jules are lovers on the run, headed southbound for a fresh start in the Sunshine State. When their car dies after a gas station robbery, they break into a nearby house looking for a new set of wheels. What they find instead is a dark secret, and a sweet-as-pie pair of homeowners who will do anything to keep it from getting out.” While it might not stick the landing, the rest of the picture leading up to the ending of Dan Berk and Robert Olsen’s Villains is a delightful run. The duo co-wrote and co-directed this film and
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CINEPOCALYPSE 2019: DEADCON is D.O.A.

As a nearly 40 year-old man, I’m likely not the target audience for Deadcon. That said, I’m really not sure who is. It doesn’t really lean too strongly into the social media influencer aspect of the story, which is ostensibly the whole selling point of Scotty Landes’ script: “Deadcon tackles isolation in the age of social media and follows real-life YouTubers Lauren Elizabeth and Claudia Sulewski as they face vengeful ghosts even more horrifying than their devoted fans.” Director Caryn Waechter’s film ends up being a found footage movie mixed with a haunted house movie set in a hotel. The trappings
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CINEPOCALYPSE 2019: THE SWERVE is a ‘Lovingly Crafted and Punishing Affair’

The Swerve is the striking — and strikingly depressing — feature debut from New Jersey-based director Dean Kapsalis, and it’s best appreciated as it was envisioned: as a suburban update on a classical Greek tragedy. While actions, and the catastrophic results of those actions, are often telegraphed well in advance, it plays out in such a bleak and uncompromising fashion that you’ll inevitably be left emotionally drained by the end. While some viewers may find the slow, occasionally ponderous, pacing to be a detriment, this portrait of a housewife’s steady mental decline proves to be a lovingly crafted and punishing affair.
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’90s Ska Doc PICK IT UP! Is For All the Checkerboard-Clad Kids Out There

I feel like it’s safe to assume that most folks reading Cinepunx have some sort of musical subculture in their background. Liam and Josh obviously have their love and history with hardcore, and all of us who write here have some sort of punk influence in their past. However, I am here today to say that my name is Nick, and *deep sigh* I used to be a ska kid. Hi, Nick! Despite having the coordination of someone with a twisted ankle and the musical ability of a cat walking across a piano, I’ve always been into ska, thanks to
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Big Eyes’ Kait Eldridge On the Band’s Ever-Evolving Sound and Their New LP, STREETS OF THE LOST

When I first heard Big Eyes‘ debut single in early 2011, I wrote that the band “does the seemingly impossible task of reconciling arena rock with classic punk.” It’s still true, even as Big Eyes gets ready to release their fourth full-length, Streets of the Lost, via Greenway Records. Each album from the now-quartet has seen frontwoman Kaitlin Eldridge expand the band’s sonic palette, and their latest is no different. Streets of the Lost takes full advantage of Paul Ridenour on guitar, allowing Eldridge’s already robust riffs to double, and the rhythm section of Ridenour’s brother Jeff on bass and
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SPECIAL EVENT: STARFISH Screening and Q&A w/ Director Al White

CINEPUNX AND YELLOW VEIL PICTURES PRESENT THE PHILADELPHIA PREMIERE OF STARFISH, THE HAUNTING FEATURE FILM DEBUT FROM A.T. WHITE Join us on March 18 for a screening at the historic Rotunda with director A.T. White in attendance for a post-screening Q&A. Philadelphia, PA (March 4, 2019) – Cinepunx and Yellow Veil Pictures are proud to present the Philadelphia premiere of Fantastic Fest-selected Starfish, the ambitious, genre-defying debut from writer and director A.T. White. For this special event, Cinepunx and Yellow Veil Pictures are excited to partner with the historic Rotunda in Philadelphia. The Rotunda (4014 Walnut St.) is a shared
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NEGRO TERROR Offers Up an Interesting Profile of the Memphis Hardcore Band

Memphis hardcore band Negro Terror first came to my attention via a post wherein someone was like, “Hey, this is a hardcore band made up of three black guys who are covering Skrewdriver songs to put a thumb in the eye of white supremacists.” Or something to that effect. Count me in, right? So, here’s the thing: anyone who’s a fan of oi / streetpunk / hardcore — hell, any sort of heavy or extreme music — is aware of the various pitfalls, sandtraps, and dangers lurking within those subgenres. Anyone who’s been told about a new black metal band
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Brooklyn Horror Film Festival: CAM

The nature of identity is a tricky thing. How do we begin to quantify what makes us who we are? For a start, we’re all physical, material beings, with biological drives and senses through which we process information. We’re also, at least in part, a construct informed and shaped by our circumstances and experiences as we stumble through life, attempting to make sense of the world we live in. And yet, our identities can’t be solely defined by the material, either; after all, if we suddenly stop perceiving, we’d still be fully aware that we’re us. Add technology to the
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Brooklyn Horror Film Festival: An Interview With THE CLOVEHITCH KILLER’s Duncan Skiles

“A shocking revelation turns a teenage boy’s world upside down in this chilling look at the evil that can lurk below even the most wholesome surface. Tyler Burnside (Charlie Plummer) is a Boy Scout, a volunteer at his local church, and the dutiful son of an upstanding, community leader dad (Dylan McDermott). Only one thing troubles the quiet Kentucky town he lives in: the unsolved murders—in which ten women were brutally tortured and killed by a psychopath known as Clovehitch—that rocked the community more than a decade ago. When Tyler discovers a cache of disturbing images in his father’s possession,
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Brooklyn Horror Film Festival: STARFISH (2018)

It’s not often I consider myself “lucky” to have been able to consume a work of art, be it a song or a painting, a film or a TV show. After all, most of the art that has changed my life hasn’t exactly been some kind of secret gem; Dawn Of The Dead is hailed by many as the greatest zombie film of all time, and who among us wouldn’t consider Purple Rain a game changer? My point is, I don’t think I came close to missing the boat on a lot of the stuff that has had an impact on
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