Archives for From the Stereo to Your Screen

FROM THE STEREO TO YOUR SCREEN: The Smithereens and TIMECOP

The Smithereens’ “Time Won’t Let Me” from Timecop Is it wrong to consider Timecop the last really enjoyable Jean-Claude Van Damme movie? Aside from JCVD, I mean. That opening scene, with the Civil War soldiers and the dude with two machine guns, is arguably one of the greater cold opens in action films, but I digress. Timecop was the end of a string of movies which positioned the Muscles from Brussels as the action hero of the early ’90s. Starting with 1988’s Bloodsport, then on through Cyborg, Kickboxer, Lionheart, Death Warrant, Double Impact, teaming up with Dolph Lundgren in Universal
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FROM THE STEREO TO YOUR SCREEN: Guns N’ Roses and TERMINATOR 2

Guns N’ Roses’ “You Could Be Mine” from Terminator 2: Judgment Day https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ze3xhgbyMqs When Terminator 2: Judgment Day came out in the summer of 1991, I did not see it in the theater. My mom dropped my brother and I off at the theater some afternoon, and while my brother saw T2, I went to see The Naked Gun 2½: The Smell of Fear, and then killed time at the comic shop down the street during the remaining hour between when my movie let out and his did. This is really strange, because I’d buy the novelization and try to collect
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FROM THE STEREO TO YOUR SCREEN: Bryan Ferry and LEGEND

“Is Your Love Strong Enough?” by Bryan Ferry from Legend Bryan Ferry was coming off a very good year when he had “Is Your Love Strong Enough?” featured in Ridley Scott’s 1986 dark fantasy film, Legend. 1985 had seen the release of his massive Boys and Girls album, which featured the hit singles “Slave to Love” and “Don’t Stop the Dance.” It was a UK number one album, and went gold in the United States as well. Per the Technicolor Dreams blog, “Ferry took an unused demo called ‘Circles’ from the Avalon sessions and adapted it into this haunting, memorable
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From the Stereo to Your Screen: Ministry & A.I.

“What About Us?” by Ministry from A.I.: Artificial Intelligence There have been numerous pieces over the years since the 2001 release of  A.I., debating whether or not Steven Spielberg’s direction was inappropriate for the work begun by Stanley Kubrick. Based on Brian Aldiss’ story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long,” the film is about a boy robot, David, who is the replacement child for a couple whose young son is in suspended animation due to a disease without a cure. A cure is found, the “real” child is cured, and David is abandoned in the woods with his robotic companion, Teddy.
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From the Stereo to Your Screen: Annie Lennox & Al Green & SCROOGED

“Put A Little Love in Your Heart,” by Annie Lennox & Al Green, from Scrooged 1988’s Scrooged always seems to get shunted to the side when we’re talking Christmas genre movies. Black Christmas and Gremlins always get the horror nods, in addition to Santa slashers like Silent Night, Deadly Night and Christmas Evil. The action advent selections are always Die Hard and Lethal Weapon, with maybe I Come In Peace for the heads. Romantic and family movies abound, obviously. However, with the exception of National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation, comedies with an acknowledgement of how awfully stressful the holidays can be —
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From the Stereo to Your Screen: The Flys & Disturbing Behavior

“Got You (Where I Want You),” by The Flys, from Disturbing Behavior We’re smack-dab in the middle of some serious ’90s nostalgia at the moment. People who grew up on Nickelodeon and MTV’s Total Request Live are now at the point where they have kids of their own, and it’s like there’s a race to see who can introduce their rugrats to … Rugrats first. So, maybe it’s due to the fact that most of us who came of age in the early-to-mid ’90s have kids who are still in elementary school or just pushing up against the tween years
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From the Stereo to Your Screen: Goo Goo Dolls & Freddy’s Dead: The Final Nightmare

“I’m Awake Now,” by Goo Goo Dolls, from Freddy’s Dead: The Final Nightmare Back when I discussed Phunk Junkeez and their contribution to the Tommy Boy soundtrack, I mentioned offhand that Goo Goo Dolls’ cover of The Damned’s “Wait for the Blackout” wasn’t bad. Being as how I’m always trying to track down weird-ass music videos for this column as well as look for bands to come on my soundtrack podcast and talk about how weird it was to have their song in a movie, I come across quite a few surprises. Thus, we come to the fact that Goo
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Unreleased Scores We’ve No Chance of Ever Seeing, But We Want Them Anyway

Thanks to a resurgence in soundtracks, there is astonishing variety of scores we never thought we’d ever see officially released: the scores for Basket Case and its sequel, Spookies, Chopping Mall, Phase IV, and Surf Nazis Must Die. These are but a few of the albums put out by the likes of Terror Vision, Waxwork, and Strange Disc, but for every obscure B-movie and cult flick out there, we can’t help but wonder at other titles which still have yet to see the light of day. Unsurprisingly, many of the titles we’re after come from the land of television, a genre
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From the Stereo to Your Screen: Salt-n-Pepa & Stay Tuned

“Start Me Up,” by Salt-n-Pepa, from Stay Tuned 1992’s Stay Tuned is a fairly meta film, for being a movie about people sucked into a television. The film’s star, John Ritter, was best known for his work in sitcoms such as Three’s Company, as was the actress who played his wife, Pam Dawber, from the likes of Mork & Mindy and My Sister Sam. There are scads of TV personalities throughout the film’s more minor roles: Don Pardo of Saturday Night Live fame plays an announcer, and Captain Lou Albano even pops up. Still, the film’s not exactly well-known, and
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From the Stereo to Your Screen: Rachel Sweet & Hairspray

“Hairspray,” by Rachel Sweet, from Hairspray Despite its many iterations — musical, movie musical, live televised musical — John Waters’ original version of Hairspray, released in 1988, remains the best. Now, I’m a fan of musicals, and I’ll admit the Tony-winning Broadway version is pretty damned solid, with opening number, “Good Morning Baltimore,” being the best of the bunch. I’ll even cut some slack to “You Can’t Stop the Beat,” despite it being almost insipidly cloying. That said, Waters’ film is just so perfectly bizarre and fun and joyous, with a perfect selection of Cameo Parkway R&B sides soundtracking everything.
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