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Review: HORROR NOIRE Offers Fresh Perspectives on Representation in the Genre

Documentaries about movies can be a tricky subgenre. Ideally, the doc should strike a balance between entertaining anecdotes and scenes from key films and the need to dig deep into the social, industrial, and cultural importance of the films. In other words, the best horror documentaries are more than just glorified clip shows with talking heads interspersed, instead actually bringing something new to how we understand the genre. With that in mind, Horror Noire: A History of Black Horror (dir. Xavier Burgin, 2019) is one of the best horror documentaries I’ve seen in a long time. As author/educator Tananarive Due
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Kansas City’s Inner Altar Melds Hardcore’s Bite With Occult Rock Theatricality

This Friday, January 18, sees the release of the debut full-length from Kansas City’s Inner Altar, via the Company. Titled Vol III, the nine-track album takes the sound the band’s been honing for several years and really brings all of the disparate influences together, keeping a sense of space-rocking openness, while eschewing the rough-and-tumble looseness that dominated their previous EPs. I described it a couple of weeks back as “Danzig by way of the Cult, playing in a big, raucous warehouse,” when the video for “Lives of Fire” dropped, but the Company’s Joshua Wilkinson did an even better job of
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Talking Her Career (and That Amazing CUTTING CLASS Interview) With Jill Schoelen

In the late ’80s and early ’90s, the films of actress Jill Schoelen were readily available in the horror section of any self-respecting video store: The Stepfather, Cutting Class, Popcorn, and When A Stranger Calls Back, to name the highlights. However, as VHS waned and DVD began to make its ascent, most of these flicks were issued only as bare-bones discs, if at all, and went out of print fairly soon thereafter. Happily, in the last few years, fans have seen deluxe Blu-ray editions with restored prints and tons of extras make their way to the marketplace. Synapse kicked everything
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The Printed Screen: DARKMAN (1990) (Part 2 of 3)

In The Printed Screen, I’ll be taking an irreverent look at comic book adaptations of notable films. We’re currently looking at the 1990 comic book adaptation of Sam Raimi’s Darkman. Read the first part of this article right here. When we last saw Darkman he was vengefully screaming his name into the sky, vowing to get payback against the goons who killed his buddy, blew up his lab, ruined his relationship, and turned his face into raw hamburger. He’s been having a day. In case you’re new to the Darkman mythos, here’s how the 1991 NES video game summarized the plot:
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Ho, Ho, Horror: All of the Seasonally Appropriate Genre Fare I Could Stomach

This year, it seems like Christmas is a time for killing in the horror genre. Over the last several weeks, I watched as many of 2018’s holiday horror releases as I could get my hands on, to the tune of a whopping eight films. In addition, I saw four seasonally appropriate releases in the theater. Lawrence’s Liberty Hall screened Black Christmas, and during the annual Nerds of Nostalgia podcast’s Christmas with the Nerds Triple Feature and Toy Drive, I caught Silent Night, Batman Returns, and The Long Kiss Goodnight. It’s been a bit of a slog, and I looked to
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BAFF 2018: Scandanavian Shorts

Looking through the schedule for this year’s Buried Alive Film Festival 2018, I was struck by the fact that there was a solid handful of shorts from Scandinavia. There’s the Finnish Helsinki Mansplaining Massacre, the Dutch Netflix and Chill, and the Norweigian Rosalina. So, I watched all of them in one afternoon, looking for a pattern or a connection. I didn’t find much of one, aside from the fact that all three were brilliantly shot, with each short having well-done cinematography which uniquely defines each visually. They were also uniformly entertaining and well worth seeking out as soon as you’re
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The Printed Screen: DARKMAN (1990) (Part 1 of 3)

In The Printed Screen, I’ll be taking an irreverent look at comic book adaptations of notable films. Some of these were released at around the same time as their film counterpart, with the comic being based on an initial script and/or concept art, while others came out months or years after the fact. I’ll break down notable differences, look at the advantages and limitations of comic books compared to celluloid, and try to look at the broader context that led to the creation of both works. The big bang for superhero movies occurred in 1989 with Tim Burton’s Batman. Stay with
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SILENCIO is An Emotional Hodge-Podge of Genres

“In order to save her son’s life, Ana must find a powerful stone. Her grandfather originally discovered it in the Zone of Silence, the Bermuda Triangle of Mexico. Throughout her desperate search, Ana stumbles upon family secrets and enemies who believe the stone’s power is worth killing for.” Silencio sold me with its poster before it sold me with its premise. You put John Noble and Rupert Graves as the ostensible major characters in anything, and you have my undivided attention. It’s not quite accurate, though, because while Noble and Graves do set up most of the plot, the story
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CINE-WEEN – Martin: The Only Vampire Film That Really Matters

Admittedly, I’m not a fan of vampire films (okay, Let Me In was tight), but one staple of every October horror list for me is George A. Romero’s often-overlooked 1978 film, Martin; the film that the director himself credits as being his favorite of his movies. At this point in Romero’s career, he’d already churned out Night of the Living Dead (the film that launched a thousand imitators), The Crazies (the remake does not hold up) and Season of the Witch (solid, but fairly forgettable). Later that year, Romero would go on to release Dawn of the Dead, another near-perfect entry in the
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Escape Through Lunacy: Philadelphia’s Dark Music Pioneer Releases New Album

Forever wars engulf entire regions of the globe. The braindead zombies of fascism are rising from the grave and again infecting political life with their noxious bite. Scientists predict we have less than 20 years to avert a worldwide climate apocalypse. In short, the world as we know it is coming to an end. Hailing from Philadelphia, Lunacy is a project about “being isolated in the world as it is, as we know it, and the demise of that world.” As with the outside world, a thread of apocalypticism runs through the project. The video for their song “Nail in
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