Posts by Justin Lore

An Interview With Cameron MacGowan (Writer And Director Of RED LETTER DAY)

A few weeks back I was lucky enough to talk to Cameron MacGowan, the writer and director of Red Letter Day. We talked about his intro to filmmaking, David Cronenberg, and the current political culture in North America amongst other things.   Justin: So first is a basic question I always like to ask. What is the origin story of how you got into filmmaking? Cameron: Probably being a child of divorce because my father would leave us alone with a stack of VHS tapes when he would go out on dates, so every weekend was just crushing movies since
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Ka Is A Wheel: A Review Of DOCTOR SLEEP

There’s a scene in Magnolia where Phillip Baker Hall, suffering from cancer with only a few months to live, tells a colleague “the Book says we might be through with the past, but the past ain’t through with us.” In other words we might think we’ve conquered our demons but trauma is something we own, and what we own always comes home. We are currently in the midst of something akin to a renaissance for Stephen King. For the past few years, it feels like there’s a new adaption of one of his works for TV or the big screen
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An Interview with David Marmor (1BR Director): BROOKLYN HORROR FILM FEST

David Marmor’s 1BR, a film about a young woman who soon finds out that her too-good-to-be-true apartment in Los Angeles is indeed too good to be true, has been creating a bit of a buzz on the festival circuit. A few days before its east coast premiere at the Brooklyn Horror Film Festival, I was lucky enough to chat with him about his path to filmmaking, his influences and inspirations, and even a little about David Lynch’s strange version of paternal anxiety. Tell me about how you got to making 1BR. Why this movie, and what compelled you to make
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BROOKLYN HORROR FILM FESTIVAL: A Review Of THE SHED

Contrary to popular belief, horror films tackling social issues is nothing new. George Romero was unabashedly open about the social commentary of his films, and John Carpenter did little to veil his criticism of Reagan-era politics during the ‘80s. Recently, filmmakers such as Jordan Peele have taken the reins of such a movement, but not all the movies serving as allegory for a deeper message are such mainstream hits as Get Out. Frank Sabatella’s The Shed is one such entry in the long, storied history of horror being used as a vehicle for social criticism. The Shed is, at its
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RED LETTER DAY: A Review

The concepts of ‘morality under duress’ and other people being essentially unknowable have a long and storied history in horror. After all, what could be scarier than not knowing for sure how everyday people, your friends, your family, your coworkers, or even yourself, would act when the chips are down and whatever checks that keep us adhering to the social construct are done away with, and nothing is quite black and white, but a murky gray. Stories like Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery” have persevered over time because they revolve around one simple concept: is the morality that keeps civilization together
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Brooklyn Horror Film Festival: THE SWERVE Is A Haunting And Beautiful Examination Of Mental Illness

In the past few years, the phrase “psychological horror” has been getting thrown around a lot, with critics applying to films like It Follows, Get Out, The Witch, and even It. Most of the time it seems to be something of a catch-all for a horror film that operates outside the box; and people unfamiliar with the genre cannot comprehend a horror film doing so, thus they fall back on calling it “psychological horror” because it sounds fancy. But rarely does a horror film that is referred to as such actually rely on psychology to generate the feeling of horror,
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DEMENTER: A Review By Justin Lore

Trauma can be a difficult thing to escape, and even if we remove ourselves from the environment it occurred in it can follow us and affect us long after the trauma itself is gone. Dementer is a stark examination of the lingering wounds that result from past trauma, and how those wounds never really heal. Dementer is the story of Katie, a woman with something of a secret past. We never learn the exact details of her life prior to the events of the film, and all we do know is told through brief and chaotic flashbacks, but we see
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